Posts Tagged ‘Washingborough’

Sainsbury’s proposed destruction of Ferry Lane and herbivore-grazed unspoilt pasture

May 23, 2022

Planning application Washingborough Ref – 22/0362/FUL

Ferry Lane a tree-lined country lane in the Lincolnshire village of Washingborough leading down to the River Witham where once there was a a ferry, hence the name. Bounded on either side by cattle-grazed pastures. From the main road, views across the fields, across the river, to the fields and hillside the other side of the river. Very popular with walkers and cyclists.

Sainsbury’s are wishing to destroy one of these fields with a a large supermarket, with car parking for 80 plus cars. The site is on a flood plain, an important carbon sink, important for wildlife. The supermarket will be a major traffic generator, the location suits Sainsbury’s due to its proximity to a recently opened bypass. It will draw traffic in off the bypass, plus through the village from more distance villages.

This planning application must be REJECTED.

The grounds for REJECTION are outlined below. Any single one is more than sufficient grounds for REJECTION.

destruction of Ferry Lane

A popular destination for walkers and cyclists, who then walk or ride along the old railway line, now part of a National Cycle Route.

vista

A view across cattle-grazed pasture, across the river to green fields and a hillside will be destroyed by an ugly eyesore Sainsbury’s supermarket.

carbon sink

Rising sea levels, rising sea temperature, melting polar ice caps, record high global temperatures, record high carbon levels in the atmosphere, Arctic 20-30C above average, forest fires, floods, droughts.

In the last week, Spain hit 40C (a record for May), the Indian subcontinent temperatures have reached 49C. Humans and wildlife cannot survive in these high temperatures.

UK is signature to international treaty to keep temperature rise within 1.5 degrees, to limit the carbon in the atmosphere. We also have UK legalisation to limit the carbon in the atmosphere.

We limit carbon in the atmosphere through:

– drastically reducing our carbon emissions
– safeguarding and enhancing carbon sinks

The traffic generated by the supermarket would increase carbon emissions.

The field is an important carbon sink.

– herbivore grazed grass an important carbon sink
– the soil an important carbon sink

Sainsbury’s would not only increase the traffic, they would destroy a vital carbon sink.

Sainsbury’s claim to be offsetting carbon by sticking solar panels on the roof, using green electricity, charging points for electric vehicles.

Setting to one side the carbon offset scam, a market for spivs speculators and bankers, it does not counter the destruction of a carbon sink for the creation of a massive traffic generator.

If Sainsbury’s wish to stick solar panels on their stores, add charging points, that is fine, but are they, or is it simply greenwash to obtain planning consent? The charging points would be a requirement of any new development.

local wildlife

Unlike a field of crops, unspoilt pasture is teeming with wildlife. An important site for wildlife.

The development of the site would lead to destruction of an important wildlife site. The lighting would be detrimental to wildlife.

Sainsbury’s claim to be creating a wildlife habit at the rear of the store. This should be treated as a sick joke. They are creating ponds for runoff. These would be contaminated with oil from the parking. We have wetlands, the river and the drain, thus creating a couple of ponds no advantage, especially when polluted with runoff, and this does not mitigate destruction of unspoilt pasture.

In the vicinity otters and kingfishers.

Has an independent Environmental Impact Assessment been carried out? If not, why not?

mental health

There is a growing body of evidence of the importance of green space for our mental health and wellbeing.

When we destroy green space we not only destroy wildlife habitat and reduce biodiversity, we destabilise Gaia and damage our own mental health and wellbeing. 

food security

The one thing coronavirus pandemic and the war in Ukraine, plus log jams at ports, has demonstrated, is the fragility of our food supply chains.

Global warming will make the fragility of our food supply chains worse.

We do not therefore destroy prime agricultural land for the profit motive of a greedy supermarket chain, especially when there are easily accessible alternatives to shop locally.

traffic

The recent opening of the bypass has led to a marked increase in traffic passing by Ferry Lane and through the village. Very noticeable when waiting at Ferry Lane Bus Stop for a bus into Lincoln. The level of traffic has more than doubled.

This development would lead to a substantial increase in traffic, as admitted by Sainsbury’s in their application for a pedestrian crossing.

Traffic lights at the railway bridge, slowed traffic will extend back to the roundabout on the bypass, then cause the bypass to back up.

Traffic will consist not only of cars, but also delivery lorries and vans.

Noise, pollution, CO2 emissions.

Locals will have difficulty getting in and out of their drives leading to inevitable accidents.

We should be reducing traffic, encouraging use of public transport, cycling walking, not generating more traffic.

job creation

The usual myth of job creation peddled.

Large supermarkets destroy jobs, they do not create jobs, if take account of jobs destroyed elsewhere in the retail sector.

If look at jobs per capital investment or jobs per square footage, it is lower than that in local small shops.

It is well documented large supermarkets do not create jobs, and yet they still peddle this myth.

local economy

Of no benefit to the local economy, whereas local businesses recycle money within the local economy, adding value to each and every pound spent. Large corporate stores drain money out of a local economy.

Sainsbury’s claim fresh bread, meat.

The dough is brought, in baked. We have a baker about to open in the village, Quality bread in Lincoln. Quality meat at the butcher in Heighington, and at Pepperdine’s and Redhill Farm shop in Lincoln.

Fruit and vegetables, street market in Lincoln High Street, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, greengrocer in Bailgate, farmers market once a month in Castle Hill in Lincoln.

The quality of produce from local businesses, and service, far higher than will find in Sainsbury’s.

And for those who wish to shop in supermarkets, no shortage in the locality. It could be argued there are too many, chasing a saturated market.

Lincoln or Heighington only a bus ride away.

Sainsbury’s claim to be reducing car trips (can use the bus), but clearly not the case else why a need for a car park for 80 plus cars?

precedent

A very dangerous president would be set.

Open season for commercial development all the way back to the bypass.

of no benefit to the village

This large store is not being proposed to benefit Washingborough, it is to add to the profit of Sainsbury’s to bring in customers from north and south of Lincoln via the bypass, and from surrounding villages further afield which will cause increased traffic through the narrow streets of Washingborough.

What would benefit Washingborough would be a small convenience store where currently located a pizza outlet. This would provide choice. Though I doubt sufficient demand in a village for two convenience stores when the village was not able to support three pubs.

No benefit, but large number of dis-benefits.

references

Shopped: The Shocking Power of British SupermarketsJoanna Blythman

Not On the Label: What Really Goes into the Food on Your PlateFelicity Lawrence
ReGenesisGeorge Monbiot

rev 1

Failure to notify change of bus route

September 1, 2020

For six months a diversion, instead of ten minutes into Lincoln thirty minutes, whilst a roundabout under construction.

Today, an hour late into town, no bus stop, temporary bus stop vanished. What did this mean, back to normal or yobs stolen the bus stop?

There was no information on the bus last week, nothing from drivers to say normal service resumed.

A lady pulled up, to say no bus, now back to previous route, road opened.

To previous bus stop, both sides of the road notice at bus stop to say bus stop not in use. No timetable.

Would it not have made sense to have left temporary bus stop in place for at least a week, notice to say normal service resumed? Or, whoever removed temporary bus stop, notices on other bus stops?

A bus passed by leaving Lincoln, therefore can expect bus into Lincoln to pass by anytime soon.

At Lincoln Central Bus Station, no timetables, not a single timetable. New timetable came into play Sunday. Information office not open. Information office never open.

High Farm Fish Bar fish n chips

May 20, 2020

Today coronavirus lockdown day fifty eight, this evening my first fish n chips since start of lockdown, but I have to order on line.

To date not having much luck. Last week I visited Elite on the Bail, looking forward to fish n chips, only to find not open until four.

Lunchtime today, I tried the Washingborough fish n chip shop, only to find not open until four, and have to place order on-line.

I decided to try again this evening.

A bit of a faffle but I guess second time around easier.

Place order, confirmed order taken, then turn up at allotted time.

Quite a clever system, fish n chip shop gets a print out with name and order. On arrival asked for name, a couple of minutes wait, then order handed out through the door, covid-19 restrictions, not allowed to enter the shop.

I can see this could become semi-permanent, no waiting, and order is ready for collection. Though hopefully people will still be able to turn up.

The first time I have had fish n chips from this fish n chip shop since last summer.

Portion size generous, fish n chips excellent.

On a par with Elite on the Bail or Elite Tritton Road.

Two fish n chips worth knowing about locally, Elite on the Bail and Washingborough fish n chip shop. To which I would add Elite Tritton Road.

Burton Road poor service and quality of fish n chips not good. No way Sign of the Fish in Sincil Street, service poor and quality of fish n chips not good.

Funeral Service for Mavis Alice Parkins

February 27, 2019

A Service of Celebration and Thanksgiving for the Life of Mavis Alice Parkins (5 June 1929 – 6 February 2019) at Washingborough Parish Church.

Mavis Alice Parkins sadly died at 1825 on Wednesday 6 February 2019. The funeral service was held three weeks later.

The service started at 1130 with the arrival of funeral cortege led by funeral director walking in front with a cane. Which sadly those attending the service did not see as they were already in the church.

The church was nigh full with with some coming from far away, as far away as the southwest of England, Turkish occupied Cyprus and even from Australia.

A very moving reading of the Eulogy by granddaughters Abigail and Jessica, interspersed with their own anecdotes.

Apart from the last few years of her life, Mavis Alice Parkins spent all her life in Lincoln.

As the coffin was lowered into its final resting place, close family and relatives each dropped in a solitary daffodil.

The reception was held at Washingborough Hall, a short walk through a hole in the wall.

A week of snow

March 4, 2018

It started Monday a week ago, awoke to a light covering of snow.  It soon melted away.

In Lincoln, bitterly cold, light flurries of snow, few people about, those that were were stocking up with food.

I had intended to leave early, instead left late, after lunch at County Restaurant the afternoon in Madame Waffle.

Tuesday the snow had arrived. Before breakfast a path cleared of snow.

A day of dark clouds, bright sunshine, heavy snowfalls.

Heavy snowfall, blizzard, and something I had never experienced before, whiteout.  This would alternate with clear blue sky and sun shining.

Subzero outside, and yet, was able to sit and relax in the conservatory, heated by the sun.

Solar power though of no use. Looking out, I see solar panels covered in snow.

Nothing moving, everyone snowed in.

Wednesday, as Tuesday, heavy snow, several inches deep, before breakfast clearing the snow.  No soonest cleared, within half an hour, at least an inch deep. Before lunch, once again clear the snow, now a couple of inches deep.

As Tuesday, heavy snow, dark clouds, sunshine. Again possible to sit in the conservatory, minus three degrees outside, drops to minus seven.

As Tuesday, heavy snowfall, blizzard, whiteout, which  would alternate with clear blue sky and sun shining.

Impossible to go out, sink into the snow.

Farnborough two days in a row, record for colddest place, minus 11.9C.

Warning, we are running out of gas. People should drop their temperature by a degree, will not notice, saves money, saves gas. If going out, turn down the thermostat by at least five degrees, then turn back up on return.

We need large gas storage facilities. We had but was closed last year. That is what happens when privatise energy supply, lose energy security, no resilience in the system.

Not possible to import from Europe, as pipes lack capacity, and even if possible, Europe colder than UK, thus need the gas.

UK was powered by North Sea Gas. It was sold of on the cheap, now UK imports roughly half the gas it needs.

Wind is providing as much energy as gas, but different usage.

Industrial users of gas cannot be cut off, crash cool a kiln and cause tens of thousands of pounds worth of damage to the kiln.

In Lincolnshire, at least 45 roads are closed, idiots who should not be out, are out in their cars no idea how to handle a car in the snow, get stuck then block the roads.

Police call in the military they cannot cope.

Thursday I managed to get out. To my surprise, many people are walking in the snow in Washingborough. I guess house bound and an opportunity to get out the house.

I ask one man, is it worth walking to the local Coop? He says no, no bread, he has taken the last milk.

As I thought, no deliveries and more people placing demand on local Coop.

Slowly running out of food.

Walking around the village, very cold, Arctic conditions, sub-zero with a gale blowing.

There has been no snow all day.

Friday again no snow. Manage to get out and walk to the local Coop. As I thought, very little stock, no bread, little in the way of vegetables, a small amount of milk.

Again very cold with strong winds blowing.

Saturday a little snow overnight, light covering of snow.

One degree Celsius. It actually feels warm.

Hop on the bus to Heighington. The Spar shop reasonably well stocked, actually able to get some bread, the butcher well stocked.

Stock up with provisions. At least will not starve.

In the afternoon a trip into Lincoln. One kind person has even cleared the bus stop.

Walking to the bus stop and waiting for the bus, cold and damp, a breeze blowing, misty.

Very bleak journey into Lincoln.

The State of the Art Lincoln Central Bus Station colder than outside.

Outside the entrance a couple of inches of slush, Lincoln City Council cannot be arsed to clear the snow.

Sincil Street and High Street the same, slush covered streets. Traders pay enough in businesses rates, the least they can expect is the streets to be cleared of slush.

More people out than I expected. Maybe Saturday, maybe first opportunity to get out of the house and into Lincoln.

Stokes on High Bridge as always, empty, same for Cafe W at Waterstone’s. On the other hand Coffee Aroma busy and at Madame Waffle packed queuing at the door to get in. That is th difference good coffee makes.

I take the opportunity to stock up with more provisions.

Walking back to the bus station, I notice the slush melting, water gathers at the lowest point and flows, the newly installed drains not at the lowest point. Yet another design flaw for the newly opened Lincoln Central Bus Station that only opened last month.

Sunday a few degrees above freezing, the snow starting to melt, very misty.

It snows, and the country grinds to a halt, the trains do not run, those that do run, break down leaving people stranded for several hours, foolish people go out in the cars, clueless driving on snow.

For the last decade winters have been mild. Temperatures of 10C, maybe drops to 5C, occasionally below zero.

These mild winters have lulled the country into a false sense of security.

The Arctic, zero degrees, at least twenty degrees warmer than it should be , strong winds circling the North Pole driving the cold air southward into Europe.

What is a heat wave in the Arctic has panicked climate scientists, as what has been observed is way beyond their worst case scenarios for climate change.

Christmas dinner at Butcher and Beast

December 25, 2017

Two days before Christmas, what was to be Christmas dinner at the Butcher and Beast.

Er, looks like sirloin steak.

Er, yes, sirloin steak.

A communication problem. What was to be a booking for Christmas lunch, was only logged as a table booking.  One would have thought, would have at least asked when booking, is this for Christmas lunch, but apparently not. Was not even aware there was a problem until brought a menu, and queried why. Only then learnt, had not been booked for Christmas lunch.

Hence sirloin steak.

Butcher and Beast is a country pub in the Lincolnshire village of Heighington, not far from Lincoln.

Food at the Butcher and Beast used to be not up to much, overpriced and very variable. Of late, much improved. Roast Sunday dinner a few months ago was excellent

Stained glass workshop at Glassumimass

April 13, 2017

A stained glass workshop at St John’s Church in Washingbough, associated with though not part of Glassumimass, an exhibition of stained-glass lanterns.

I had no idea what to expect. Images of furnaces, molten glass, production of stained glass.

Er, not quite.

This was a session in production of stained glass panes.

I chose a wonderful complex piece.

No, no, I was told, far too difficult.

I also learnt I was looking at it the wrong way around.

We were given simple designs to try.

I decide to design my own piece.

A mistake, but I learnt the hard way.  I also learnt, no way could I have achieved the complex piece I had laid my eyes upon.

First choose pieces of stained glass from boxes of off cuts.

Nothing goes to waste in the world of stained glass, stained glass is expensive.

This was where I hit the first problem.

Without choosing a large off cut of stained glass, I could not find pieces large enough.

Choosing colours was abandoned, I thought vaguely abstract sea, maybe blood red sky.

Now it was down to find appropriate size pieces of stained glass.

These found, next stage was cutting the pieces to my pattern.

Not as easy as it looked.  I was not applying sufficient pressure to the glass cutter.

Straight lines not too difficult, but curves, and I had plenty of curves, much more difficult.

Breaking off the glass, once cut, was surprisingly easy.

But, my cutting was not too accurate the pieces did not fit together.

It was now a session on the grinder, a long session, to try and make up for my poor quality glass cutting.

It is also necessary to go all around each piece with the grinder, to establish a rough edge for the next stage.

But first, all the pieces to be washed and dried, to clean off any dirt and grease.

Next, apply a thin strip of copper tape all the way around each piece.

This was relatively easy, and practice improved.

Now already against the clock.

I did it too quick, the edges not centred on the tape.

Next smooth down the tape with a special tool, and the edges.

Now apply the solder.

Apply the solder, plus the copper tape, is what is known as the Tiffany process, named after Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) of New York who developed the copper foil process.

This too was relatively easy.

I cannot say I am too happy with my final stained glass, but, it was a first attempt, not bad for a first attempt, and now I have the hang of it, my next piece will be better.

If nothing else, next time I look at a stained glass window, I will now have a deeper appreciation of what I am looking at, the skills involved.

Many thanks to Marion Sanders of artsNK for all her help, and the lady who runs on a Thursday morning a stained glass workshop in the neighbouring village of Heighington.

Glassumimass a project of artsNK that has resulted in three glass lanterns inspired by local churches along Spires and Steeples Arts and Heritage Trail.

Glassumimass exhibition at St John’s until 23rd April 2017. It will then tour other churches on the trail.

The exhibition is open from 10am to 2pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, and from 12.30pm to 4.30pm on Saturdays and Sundays.

Washingborough is a small village three miles east of the city of Lincoln on the lower slopes of the limestone escarpment known as the Lincoln Edge where the River Witham breaks through the Lincoln Edge at the Lincoln Gap.

Glassumimass

April 9, 2017

An exhibition of stained glass at St John’s Church, Washingborough.

I was surprised at the length of durataion of the exhibition.

I queried this, and was told it was due to the fragility of the pieces and the reluctance to move them.

Good to find St John’s open.

11am until 1pm Thursday 17 April 2017, there will be a free stained glass workshop in the church.

Glassumimass a project of artsNK that has resulted in three glass lanterns inspired by local churches along Spires and Steeples Arts and Heritage Trail.

Exhibition until 23rd April 2017. It will then tour other churches on the trail.

The exhibition is open from 10am to 2pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, and from 12.30pm to 4.30pm on Saturdays and Sundays.

Washingborough is a small village three miles east of the city of Lincoln on the lower slopes of the limestone escarpment known as the Lincoln Edge where the River Witham breaks through the Lincoln Edge at the Lincoln Gap.

Daffodils

March 26, 2017

Unusual daffodils, very pale, growing at the roadside.

Garden flowers

March 25, 2017

For about a week, spring flowers have been out in the garden.

Frost at six in the morning, a lovely warm sunny spring day, sat in the garden reading Standart issue 6.


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