Posts Tagged ‘Lincoln’

Cappuccino at Makushi

April 26, 2017

I popped in Makushi yesterday, their latest beans from Costa Rica not yet available, carrying out test roastings.

Today I received word, the beans from Costa Rica were now available.

Not as yet serving, still the beans from Brazil, but were available to buy as bags of beans.

I picked up two bags and had as always, an excellent cappuccino.

Located half way up Steep Hill, Makushi is a coffee shop worth visiting.

Word seems to be spreading.  Earlier in the year, I was often the only customer, this month busy, today very busy.

Makushi is a definite candidate for inclusion in the third edition of Northern Independent Coffee Guide when published.

Cappuccino at Makushi

April 25, 2017

As always, excellent cappuccino at Makushi.

I had hoped they would have had their latest beans available, but sadly not.  Test roasting to determine optimum roast profile.

Knight of the Skies

April 23, 2017

Last year, cows started appearing all over Guildford. In Brighton it was snow dogs. In Lincoln it is Knights.

Bomber Command Memorial is rarely open, as work is still ongoing. Today was one of those special days when open.

Today a very special visitor, Knight of The Skies, kitted out as aircrew in WWII Bomber Command.

Designer of Knight of the Skies Rosie Ablewhite could not be present. Had she been, I would have complimented her on her interpretation.

I will not describe, other than to mention the sword, look carefully and will see it is the Spire, look again, and will see it is the same as the wingspan of an Avro Lancaster.

The sword is covered in corten steel, same material as the Spire and the concentric Memorial Walls.

Knight of the Skies is signed by the sole surviving member of the Dambusters Raid.

Knight of the Skies will move. He will be found at the top of Steep Hill, in Castle Hill, outside Lincoln Castle where he will be part of the Knights Trail.

Lincoln Knights’ Trail – 36 knights across Lincoln city centre – to celebrate the 800th anniversary of the Battle of Lincoln and the sealing of the Charter of the Forest.

According to Professor David Carpenter:

The Battle of Lincoln, one of the most decisive in English history, meant that England would be ruled by the Angevin, not the Capetian dynasty.

The Knights in Lincoln, cows in Guildford, snow dogs in Brighton, are part of a much larger project, Wild in Art.

St George’s Day at Bomber Command Memorial Spire

April 23, 2017

When I last visited Bomber Command Memorial Spire, it was an unpleasant cold March afternoon. Today, by pleasant contrast, although a chill in the air in the morning, a pleasant warm sunny afternoon, especially if got out of the wind.

Daffodils were still in flower. The variety I learnt, a very pale yellow, almost white, is Lady of Lincolnshire.

There are areas of grass intended to be regularly cut, others are of rough grass. I would strongly recommend, the rough areas, sow wild flower seeds and manage as a traditional hay meadow. Allow the grass to grow tall, wait until seeded then mow some time late June. It may even be possible to find a farmer who will be interested in the hay. Then once the hay cut and removed, mow regular, but not short. Ideally once cut for hay, graze animals, rare breeds

There needs to be access to the South Common. If not open access, then a fence or a wall, with a gate, that leads direct down from the Spire, where a path runs along and a path or steps leading down into the common, all it would require are steps leading down to the path.

Today we were honoured with Knight of the Skies, one of a series of Knights dotted around Lincoln. He will then, I was told, move to Castle Hill, top of Steep Hill, outside Lincoln Castle, where he will form part of the Knights Trail.

Bomber Command Memorial was due to officially open in September. That date has now been put back to next year, when it will coincide with 100th Anniversary of the founding of the Royal Air Force.

Painting the ‘Knight of the Skies’

April 23, 2017

Rosie Rockets

You may remember the Lincoln Baron’s Trail in 2015 where I was fortunate enough to have a couple of designs chosen. Well this year, there’s yet another ‘Wild in Art’ trail to celebrate the 800th Anniversary of the Battle of Lincoln and the sealing of the Charter of the Forrest. This time there’ll be 36 Knight Statues around the City of Lincoln, from May 20th – September 3rd 2017. At the end of the trail in October, they’ll once again be auctioned off, raising money for the Trussell Trust.

As soon as I heard news of another trail I submitted designs straight away, bearing in mind there were a few briefs for Aviation themes – a specialty of mine. I was delighted to hear that once my design was shortlisted I was able to produce a mini Knight, giving myself a much better idea of the outcome. Good news kept…

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Cappuccino at Makushi

April 22, 2017

As always, excellent cappuccino at Makushi.

I had hoped to try their new beans but not yet roasted.

Lincoln busier than I saw at Christmas, though I would normally avoid any town centre on a Saturday.  Busy even for a Saturday. Unfortunately, also full of gangs of drunks.

Cappuccino in Makushi

April 20, 2017

As always, excellent cappuccino in Makushi.

Roughly once a month, Makushi has a new consignment of coffee beans.

It seems it was only a couple of weeks ago, I was looking forward to beans from Brazil.

Already a new consignment of beans has been delivered, roasting maybe tomorrow.

Lincoln farmers market

April 14, 2017

Is this sad little market someones idea of a joke?

Half a dozen stalls.

Maybe middle of winter, early January, but this is mid-April, spring.

I chatted to one of the stalls, to learn it does not get much better in the summer, when fresh produce.

I found a leaflet, but what was shown appeared to be wishful thinking, as only fresh meat on the market today. I saw no bread, cheeses, cask ales.

I learnt there was a market Saturday, but up by Lincoln Castle. That there was a market every Friday, but in a different location.

Therefore had one found next week, a market further down the High Street, then turned up the next week, and found no market, would you turn up again?

And what of publicity? I have seen none.

I had had afternoon tea at Henry’s, was walking back down the High Street, through The Stonebow, was passing Stokes on High Bridge, when I noticed a few stalls further down the High Street.

As I walked past the stalls, I noticed people were walking past, not even glancing at the stalls, let alone stopping to have a look.

Very apparent no one was there for the market, but then with no publicity, only half a dozen stalls, hardly surprising.

I would not make a special trip.

Is this the best Lincoln can do, a city of 100,000 souls, surrounded by villages, a county town for an agricultural county?

But then Lincoln, a market town, does not even have a market.

Whoever is responsible for this market should hang their heads in shame.

I did at least pick up excellent strawberries.

Stained glass workshop at Glassumimass

April 13, 2017

A stained glass workshop at St John’s Church in Washingbough, associated with though not part of Glassumimass, an exhibition of stained-glass lanterns.

I had no idea what to expect. Images of furnaces, molten glass, production of stained glass.

Er, not quite.

This was a session in production of stained glass panes.

I chose a wonderful complex piece.

No, no, I was told, far too difficult.

I also learnt I was looking at it the wrong way around.

We were given simple designs to try.

I decide to design my own piece.

A mistake, but I learnt the hard way.  I also learnt, no way could I have achieved the complex piece I had laid my eyes upon.

First choose pieces of stained glass from boxes of off cuts.

Nothing goes to waste in the world of stained glass, stained glass is expensive.

This was where I hit the first problem.

Without choosing a large off cut of stained glass, I could not find pieces large enough.

Choosing colours was abandoned, I thought vaguely abstract sea, maybe blood red sky.

Now it was down to find appropriate size pieces of stained glass.

These found, next stage was cutting the pieces to my pattern.

Not as easy as it looked.  I was not applying sufficient pressure to the glass cutter.

Straight lines not too difficult, but curves, and I had plenty of curves, much more difficult.

Breaking off the glass, once cut, was surprisingly easy.

But, my cutting was not too accurate the pieces did not fit together.

It was now a session on the grinder, a long session, to try and make up for my poor quality glass cutting.

It is also necessary to go all around each piece with the grinder, to establish a rough edge for the next stage.

But first, all the pieces to be washed and dried, to clean off any dirt and grease.

Next, apply a thin strip of copper tape all the way around each piece.

This was relatively easy, and practice improved.

Now already against the clock.

I did it too quick, the edges not centred on the tape.

Next smooth down the tape with a special tool, and the edges.

Now apply the solder.

Apply the solder, plus the copper tape, is what is known as the Tiffany process, named after Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) of New York who developed the copper foil process.

This too was relatively easy.

I cannot say I am too happy with my final stained glass, but, it was a first attempt, not bad for a first attempt, and now I have the hang of it, my next piece will be better.

If nothing else, next time I look at a stained glass window, I will now have a deeper appreciation of what I am looking at, the skills involved.

Many thanks to Marion Sanders of artsNK for all her help, and the lady who runs on a Thursday morning a stained glass workshop in the neighbouring village of Heighington.

Glassumimass a project of artsNK that has resulted in three glass lanterns inspired by local churches along Spires and Steeples Arts and Heritage Trail.

Glassumimass exhibition at St John’s until 23rd April 2017. It will then tour other churches on the trail.

The exhibition is open from 10am to 2pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, and from 12.30pm to 4.30pm on Saturdays and Sundays.

Washingborough is a small village three miles east of the city of Lincoln on the lower slopes of the limestone escarpment known as the Lincoln Edge where the River Witham breaks through the Lincoln Edge at the Lincoln Gap.

Cappuccino in Makushi

April 11, 2017

A pleasant afternoon, sunny, but cold in the wind,

I walked up Steep Hill, to Makushi.

Well strictly speaking, I did not, I walked up The Strait, went on a detour to The Collection, then carried on up Well Lane, along Danesgate, which brought me half way up Steep Hill, opposite Makushi.

I walked up Steep Hill, as far as Pimento tea rooms, and looked in Imperial Teas located in Norman House, Bookstop Cafe is located in the undercroft below.

Mainly tea, but they also do coffee.  I counted seven shelves, each with five large jars of coffee. More shelves of the same coffee behind the counter.

I did not sample any, but they looked over roasted.  No roast date given, and when I asked, given the usual story, freshly roasted, only yesterday. Unless large turnover then I doubt at their best.

I was reminded of La Cafeína in La Laguna.

On the way up, I popped in Madame Waffle, picked up latest copy of Caffeine, inquired if they had copies left of Standart, yes they did, I said I would pick up later.

For the last couple of weeks, I have been waiting for the latest batch of beans in Makushi, this time from Brazil, today they were in.

When one thinks of Brazil, one thinks of large mechanised plantations, low quality commodity coffee.

But they also grow and produce quality coffee.

Today, florentines. I resisted the temptation, had three put in a box.

The little garden out the back is now open. I am pleased to report, No Smoking.

Back down in the town, Standart issues 6 and 7 picked up from Madame Waffle. I wish I could find issue 5. Strange Standart do not list Madame Waffle as a stockist.

Looked in Ruddock’s, which is closing after 163 years in business, last day Easter Saturday.

Henry’s tea rooms will also have last day on Easter Saturday.