Posts Tagged ‘Lincoln Castle’

Cappuccino in Makushi

April 6, 2017

A pleasant sunny morning.

A walk to the top of Steep Hill, then how to get to The Lawn?

I asked at Lincoln Castle. Walk straight through and out the other gate, the helpful guide explained. But I do not have a ticket. You do not need a ticket, it is free.

This surprised me that it was free. Apparently Lincoln Castle has been free since 2014, though there is a fee to access parts of Lincoln Castle.

The Lawn has been purchased by Stokes for the princely sum of £250,000. It looks derelict and unlikely to be open any time soon.  When open it will house a coffee shop, a roastery, a tea and coffee museum, and provide coffee training.

Outside Lincoln Castle, a guy playing classical guitar.

On my way back down, cappuccino in Makushi.

I had hoped for their new beans from Brazil, but no, maybe by Friday.

Bottom of The Strait, a new coffee shop is due to open Good Friday.

Top of the High Street, just through The Stonebow, Bartek Dabrowski playing acoustic guitar. He ws quite good.

Misty morning The Strait and Steep Hill

January 10, 2013
Steep Hill in the mist

Steep Hill in the mist

Steep Hill in the mist

Steep Hill in the mist

Steep Hill in the mist

Steep Hill in the mist

Very foggy this morning.

Walking up the Strait and Steep Hill, very misty, very atmospheric, the stuff of a Victorian melodrama, which explains why many such dramas have been filmed here.

The towers of Lincoln Cathedral were shrouded in mist, as was the entrance and walls of Lincoln Castle.

Westgate, which follows the walls of the castle, freezing cold fog.

Walking back down, the sun came out for a brief period, but not for long, back came the mist.

Lincoln Cathedral

January 22, 2012
Lincoln Cathedral

Lincoln Cathedral

Lincoln Cathedral sits atop of a hill. It is visible from miles around, but within the city not so as the short-sighted Lincoln City Council has allowed the erection of appalling multi-story eyesores. The same city council that has presided over destruction of the heart of the city, has put the historic Lawn up for sale and now plans the destruction of Sincil Street, the one area of character left in the city centre. It used to be policy to not allow any building to obstruct the historic skyline, but now greed and fast bucks is all that matters.

The best way to approach the Cathedral is on foot. From the top of the High Street, up The Strait, passed Norman Houses, up Steep Hill and more Norman Houses, and the cathedral is there when you reach the top. On the way up you will get tantalising glimpses of the cathedral.

Resist the temptation to tarry, if you do, you will not have time to look around Lincoln Cathedral. Though there is lots to see on the way up. If you do tarry, then make the most of it and save the cathedral for another day.

I did tarry, with the result that on the two days I made it to Lincoln Cathedral, before Christmas and in the New Year, I had no time other than to look in the door, have a chat with the Duty Chaplain and light candles.

Lincoln Cathedral was founded by the Normans not long after they invaded, as was Lincoln Castle. It is the finest Gothic Cathedral in Europe, as you will see when you step through the door and look down the nave. The view down the nave literally takes the breath away. Worth the climb if you only look down the nave then have to turn around and set off back down the hill. As did I.

Inside the Cathedral the Lincoln Imp, Cathedral treasures and lovely cloisters that are very tranquil to walk around.

Lincoln Cathedral owns one of the four surviving copies of the Magna Carta, currently on loan to Lincoln Castle.

Lincoln Cathedral was used as the set for The Da Vinci Code, with Tom Hanks staying at the nearby White Hart.

I have a knack of being in the right place at the right time. The light on the walls is the winter sun filtering through the stained glass windows at midday.

The cathedral on the hill is the cathedral being caught by the morning sun not long after sunrise. But note the ugly building on the left, a blot on the landscape.

Candles in the side chapel are a bit of a disappointment. A sand pit! I would have at the very least expected wrought iron candle holders.

The book to get on Lincoln cathedral is Capturing Lincoln Cathedral, though you will have a job as it was a limited edition edition and I picked up the only two remaining copies. It captures the cathdral in all its moods.