Posts Tagged ‘Labour Leader’

T-O-N-Y! YOU AIN’T GOT NO ALIBI. YOU TORY!

July 24, 2015

It’s difficult to know anything certain about modern politics. As Adam Curtis points out in his “Oh-Dearism” documentary, there is an emerging “strategy of power that keeps any opposition constantly confused, a ceaseless shapeshifting that is unstoppable because it’s indefinable”. It’s diaphanous, a dark attic full of spider webs, and the intention of the political elite is to make sure you don’t understand.

Every now and again, though, a little light breaks through the murk, and lets us see what the machinating cluster of arachnids are up to.

It seems rather telling that the mainstream establishment is getting all shrill and scurrilous about Jeremy Corbyn. After the poll that said Corbyn would win the Labour leadership 6 points ahead of Andy Burnham, centrists, Blairites and Blairs fell over each other to slander the man himself, as unelectable, and then to scoff at his supporters. St. Tony of Baghdad, lobbyist to the shadows, left many reeling with indignation when he spoke to the think tank Progress on Wednesday. Let us not forget that there is a wide consensus that this man should be tried for war crimes, and yet he has the gall to tell others to get “a heart transplant”?! He appeared from his coffin, looking like a wax puppet from an American remake of a Japanese horror film, and condescended to the nation with talk of winning “from the centre” and the dangers of comfort blankets. The sheep-dog yapped and the flock bolted. Margaret Beckett described herself as a “moron” for supporting Corbyn’s candidacy. Yvette Cooper said she would never serve in a shadow cabinet lead by Corbyn. John McTernan suggested that two candidates should drop out of the race to create an “anyone-but-Corbyn” campaign. The barks and bleats have become deafening.

In a leadership election that should be defined by new rules that make it more democratic, it seems ironically undemocratic that this tactic of sabotage should be used from within the party. The momentum is with Corbyn. Doesn’t it show a huge arrogance, for the other leading Labour politicians, to flagrantly disregard what the most significant faction of Labour supporters are saying? Rather than denigrating the man’s personality and dragging their heels in New Labour mud, shouldn’t they recognise that what many people want is a party of real opposition to sit next to the SNP in the house of commons? And if the left-wing are so “unelectable”, please tell me how the SNP won all those seats?

I’m not sure that this hullabaloo is at all damaging to Corbyn’s campaign though. That conversation we were all having for the previous god-knows-how-long (you know, the one about the Westminster bubble and the London elite being out of touch; the one that resulted in massive election turn outs for the SNP and UKIP), it didn’t just go away because we had a general election. Right now, the more Jeremy Corbyn is held cheap by the establishment, the more he begins to look like an intriguing outsider, relatable, and unfazed with the squabbling in the political playground.

The inverse of Nigel Farage, he appears to be a cool-headed, honest, considerate man, one of the few modern politicians who doesn’t seem to have been trained in neuro-linguistic programming, unconflicted in his political views, and abstemious in his daily life. He is one of the only politicians of note that seems to truly recognise the dire inequality that exists in this country today and actually have a problem with it. There is something inherently virtuous about him, and that is a quality that can rally the support of a lot of people, and most importantly, a lot of young people. With the big three zero on the horizon for me, I don’t know if I still count as a “young person”. What I can say is that for the first time in my adult life there is a politician from a mainstream party who shares my views and those of most people I know, and also has a chance of actually doing something to create a shift in the paradigm, from corporate puppetry to conscientious societal representation.

The hysteria that has rendered certain members of the Labour party catatonic, and has the right wing press rubbing its hands together in glee, is ultimately based on nonsense. The fact is that this election is not for the position of king of kings but for the leader of a party of equals. No matter how far left Jeremy Corbyn is, if he is voted leader he will have to represent a party that is jam packed with shy Tories and Blairites. He would be dragged towards the centre ground anyway. But he would have galvanised the support of many disparate factions of society, who didn’t vote in the general election, or who voted UKIP, or maybe even some of those who voted Tory.

In the USA, Senator Bernie Sanders is currently running his presidential campaign for 2016. He is a firebrand, a self proclaimed democratic socialist, and support for him is snow-balling. He’s a straight talking realist who is committed to outing the perversions of the system and seems to be unafraid of standing up for the rights of individuals against those of corporations. At the official opening of his campaign in Vermont in May, he had one clear message to anyone who doubted his ability to win: “Don’t underestimate me.” It seems that it wasn’t until Jeremy Corbyn took the lead in the polls that the rest of the Labour party worked out not to underestimate him. It just might be that he is the right person to clean out the cobwebs and fix those attic lights.

— Charlotte Church

Reposted from CharlotteSayshmmm.

Wonderful words from Charlotte Church.

As she says

He is one of the only politicians of note that seems to truly recognise the dire inequality that exists in this country today and actually have a problem with it. There is something inherently virtuous about him, and that is a quality that can rally the support of a lot of people, and most importantly, a lot of young people. … What I can say is that for the first time in my adult life there is a politician from a mainstream party who shares my views and those of most people I know, and also has a chance of actually doing something to create a shift in the paradigm, from corporate puppetry to conscientious societal representation.

Jeremy Corbyn has managed to engage with ordinary people, who do not wish to be ruled by a political class that acts for banksters and corporations.

If you want to vote for Jeremy Corbyn, simply register as a Labour Party Supporter at a one off fee of £3 and you can vote.

Jeremy Corbyn addressing a meeting in Bristol

July 24, 2015
packed meeting in Bristol to hear  Jeremy Corbyn

packed meeting in Bristol to hear Jeremy Corbyn

A picture is worth a thousand words. Every picture tells a story.

A packed meeting in Bristol to hear Jeremy Corbyn speak.

People’s Campaign for Corbyn:

Absolutely packed Jeremy Corbyn meeting in Bristol tonight. Politics is changing in Britain before our very eyes and the Blairites can keep moaning all they like but they won’t stop this movement.

People do not vote because they are sick and disgusted with two-faced hypocrites out to line their own pockets, who do not speak for them, who act for the banks and big business.

Jeremy Corbyn, like Caroline Lucas, is a rare example of a politician who listens to people, who shares their concerns, who acts for them.

He was on the streets demonstrating against austerity, supporting the Greeks in their fight against the EU.

It is because he is listening, that people sense real change, that people are willing to back him, turn out to meetings to hear what he has to say, lend their support.

The attack on Jeremy Corbyn by discredited and despised Tony Blair, only added to his support.

As has Labour wannabe leader Liz Kendal who said he is unfit to lead the Labour Party. No, the one who is unfit is Liz Kendal, who supports Tory attacks on the poor.

The Labour Establishment has crawled out of the woodwork to attack Jeremy Corbyn. These are the same people who lost the Election in May, who still do not get it why Labour lost.

Harriet Harman does not get it when she told Labour MPs not to vote against the Tory Welfare Bill that will take £12 billion out of the pockets of the poor. 48 Labour MPs had the decency and integrity of ignoring her, 48 Labour MPs that included Jeremy Corbyn, that included 18 newly elected Labour MPs, voted against the Welfare Bill.

They were accused by the Labour Establishment of damaging the Party, no those who damaged the Party were those who sat on their hands who could not be bothered to vote.

Tweedledee v Tweedledum, that was why Labour lost the election, no one could tell the difference. If you are going to vote Tory, you may as well vote the real thing, or not vote at all. In Scotland they had a real choice, that is why they voted SNP and why Labour is unelectable in Scotland for the foreseeable future.

People do not want austerity, they do not want to see library closures, cuts to NHS, the poorest people in society being bled dry, companies like Starbucks and Vodafone failing to pay taxes, privatised rail and power and water companies ripping us off, bankers getting away with fraud.

Mark Steel on Jeremy Corbyn:

If you look at Corbyn’s record it’s clear he just can’t win elections. In his constituency of Islington North he inherited a majority of 4,456, which is now 21,194. He’s one of the few Labour MPs whose vote increased between 2005 and 2010, when he added 5,685 to his majority. This is typical of the man, defying the official Labour policy of losing votes and getting more of them instead, just to be a rebel.

If you want to vote for Jeremy Corbyn, simply register as a Labour Party Supporter at a one off fee of £3 and you can vote.

Harriet Harman has completely lost the plot

July 12, 2015

Harriet Harman has completely lost the plot

Harriet Harman has said Labour will support the Tory attacks on the poor announced in last week’s budget. Poorest families are hardest hit, with a loss of £1000 per poor family.

These cuts are not only immoral they are economicially illiterate. Poor people spend money in the local economy. £1000 per poor family, that adds up to a huge loss of money flowing into a deprived area.

No surprise in the announcement from Harriet Harman as interim Labour Leader. Labour before the election voted for austerity.

Austerity is a completely failed policy, it is an excuse for shock doctrine, cuts in public services, welfare cuts, mass library closures, but Labour voted for austerity.

Harriet Harman just does not get it why Labour lost the election, lost it big time. They were wiped out in Scotland by the SNP, lost in England to UKIP and the Tories.

Tweedledum v Tweedledee. No one can tell the difference. If you are going to vote for Tory policies, you may as well vote Tory, or if you want something different UKIP, or not vote at all.

People have woken up to the fact that if they vote, under the present corrupt system, if you trouble to cast a vote, you are simply legitimising a corrupt system, deciding who gets the chance to sit at the top table and act for big business. Nothing has really changed, simply a different faction of the Establishment.

Of the four Labour Party wannabe leaders only Jeremy Corbyn has shown any decency or integrity. On the day of the budget, he addressed the anti-austerity protest outside, he addressed the Greek Solidarity protest. Where were the other wannabe candidates? Nowhere to be seen.

Where has been the voice of support for Greeks from Labour, a condemnation of the Fourth Rech (aka EU)? A deafening silence. Why, because the Greeks are an embarrassment to Labour, they highlight how useless Labour and why Labour is unelectable for the foreseeable future.

Across the country, crowds of enthusiastic supporters turn out for Jeremy Corbyn.

Harriet Harman warned against voting for Jeremy Corbyn, without mentioning by name.

There is a faction of the Labour Party, probably Blair cronies longing for the good old days, calling for a vote for anyone, so long as not Jeremy Corbyn.

If you want to vote for Jeremy Corbyn, simply register as a Labour Party Supporter at a one off fee of £3 and you can vote.

If Labour MPs had any decency left, they would ignore Harriet Harman and vote against the Tory budget cuts, leaving her isolated as leader of a party of one. Will it happen? I doubt it. Which is why Labour is unelectable for the foreseeable future.