Posts Tagged ‘Islington’

Benita Bakery

May 1, 2017

Opposite Union Chapel, alongside Costa and tax-dodging Starbucks.

The decor excellent, but the same cannot be said of either the coffee or the pastries.

Sadly not a clue. The coffee not ground fresh for each cup, I checked what they use, a freshly opened bag, it smelt disgusting, no roast date, basically rubbish for catering supplies.  Pastries and stuff to be hotted up. No flapjacks or cookies.

The best to be said of the coffee, drinkable.

But why bother?

There can be no excuse for sourcing cheap rubbish coffee when in  London have Monmouth Coffee, Union hand-roasted, Square Mile.

44 Islington Park Street

June 7, 2015
44 Islington Park Street

44 Islington Park Street

Islington Park Street or to be more precise 44 Islington Park Street is four Victorian properties knocked into one.

It was created in the early 1970s by a former Franciscan friar Greg Moore.

His big idea was that vulnerable people such as recovering drug addicts and ex-offenders would live side-by-side with those who did not have problems in a network of communes. He also established the  Crescent Road Community in Kingston upon Thames

The tenants at both communities are now facing eviction by One Housing Group.

One Housing Group are a Housing Association.

A Housing Association from its name, sounds ok, a nice community feel,  but they are not, these are greed-driven, unaccountable, modern day Rachman landlords.

As the tenants of what was then Pavilion Housing Association at Firgrove Court learnt one day when they awoke to find their homes earmarked for a supermarket car park, part of the destruction of Farnborough town centre by a greedy property developer.

One Housing Group are behaving true to form. They want to evict their tenants to realise the asset value of the properties.

One Housing Group (OHG) last month wrote to the communes’ residents saying it intended to “decant” them.

Are people like the contents of a wine bottle, to be decanted?

Decant being a weasel word for eviction.

We are two London communities, one made up of 18 low-income adults who share a cooperative house in Islington, the other is 21 adults and 3 children who share a similar house in Kingston. Our communities have been in existence for nearly 40 years and some of us have lived in our home for over three decades.

One Housing Group, the housing association that owns our properties, has stated that “group homes” such as ours must be “phased out” and that they intend to “decant” us. Court proceedings are being initiated in an attempt to evict all residents from the properties as soon as possible.

Our residents range in age from 4 to 79 and we are thriving examples of supportive, sustainable communal living. We cook, eat and socialise together, make decisions together about how our houses are run, and collectively provide care and support to those of our residents who are young, elderly or sick.

Many of us are vulnerable and will be seriously affected if we are evicted from our home. One older resident has Parkinson’s disease and is likely to be forced into residential care if he is removed from his house. Another spent his youth in foster care and was placed in his house by social services, aged 16; this is the only home he has known. One resident found her community as a place of safety following years of domestic abuse. Children may have to change their schooling and sole parents will lose their support systems and local contacts.

Our way of life offers a positive vision of sustainable, supportive, affordable communal living and an alternative to the social isolation faced by many in the city. Social landlords should be fostering more communities like ours, not tearing us apart.

The experience of the Firgrove Court tenants, was eviction from maisonettes set within extensive green space, to two blocks of ugly flats with a car parking space.

What we are seeing for the two properties in London, is ongoing social cleansing. Tenants being cleansed from desirable parts of London, being kicked out of their homes to enable the owners of the properties be it private landlords or social landlords profiting from the evictions and repossessions.

Please sign the petition opposing eviction of these two communities.

Top story in Real Estate Late Edition (Tuesday 9 June 2015).

The last moments of The Alma

November 9, 2013
landlady Kirsty Valentine outside The Alma

landlady Kirsty Valentine outside The Alma on eviction day

It’s 9.20am on a Friday morning and the Alma pub, recently crowned as North London Cider pub of the year by Camra, is busy. It isn’t open. The only drinks being consumed are tea and coffee. Everyone there, locals, friends and supporters, local MP Jeremy Corbyn, writer Pete Brown, are not there to toast landlady’s Kirsty Valentine’s success, but to be with her and offer support as bailiffs are expected at any moment to turf her out.

It’s the culmination of four years of fighting with owners, Enterprise Inns, the pub company (pubco) which own the pub. Kirsty has vigorously campaigned to reduce the rent, claiming it was impossible for her to make decent standard of living; conversely Enterprise claim they have tried to help find a solution.

But the time for negotiation ended on Thursday when Kirsty lost in court.

At 9.30, a representative from Enterprise is standing outside the locked doors of the pub with a man in a hi-vis jacket; he’s the man who will fix shutters to the doors and windows when the bailiff arrives.

Enterprise representative, plus 'shutters man' arrive

Enterprise representative, plus ‘shutters man’ arrive

A locksmith appears. He looks somewhat surprised at the sight inside. ‘I was told this was a non-confrontational job, look at ‘em. There’s dozens in there. No one wants to lose their local.’ He speaks in a friendly manner, with an energetic, north-London ‘geezer’ accent.

When he does arrive, the bailiff is quiet, evidently keen not to be drawn into a confrontation. Still, two police officers pull up in a marked car, there to ensure there is no breach of the peace. Inside the pub, Kirsty is locked in conversations with lawyers trying desperately to come up with a last minute offer which might satisfy Enterprise’s demands. I’m told that Enterprise have said they will not accept any offer and just want her out (Enterprise dispute this).

Just after ten, the bailiff and Kirsty go to a back room of the pub to discuss matters. It’s agreed that they will leave the pub; there is no need for police, and bags of possessions, heaped on the floor start to be taken out.

With tears welling up, Kirsty goes behind the bar one final time and beckons her supporters to come and join her. They line up and hug; one final act of defiance before becoming a statistic, one of the 26 pubs which shut every week. The Alma is now closed.

Kirsty goes behind the bar one final time

Kirsty goes behind the bar one final time

Enterprise insist they are very keen to reopen The Alma as soon as possible, countering fears that it could become a block of flats or a supermarket. In a statement, the company describe the Newington Green site as ‘a great pub with a fantastic community spirit and we want it to continue to thrive’. They also claim that the dispute actually is ‘a clear example where the tied pub model…. has provided extraordinary levels of support, flexibility and ultimately direct financial assistance to a tenant’.

They add: ‘Regrettably therefore, we have been left with no alternative but to revoke her tenancy and will seek to put in place a new operator as soon as possible.’

As for Kirsty, she has lost her home – she lived above the pub – her business and livelihood – ‘they’ve wiped me out in 12 hours’ she says. Friends have rallied round and offered her places to stay while she continues her next move.

‘I can’t even begin to consider anything much because I’m just so, I’m just in shock. It’s a mixture of shock and relief that it’s finally all over.’

As for whether she will return to the pub trade, she is very unsure.

‘I need to go away and sit in the corner for a very long time and contemplate things.’

But considering the tumultuous events of the day, she sounds remarkably chipper and stoical; buoyed by the impressive support during her final moments at the pub.

‘I was so thrilled, it’s made it so much easier to deal with. For many many months, I have wondered what his moment would feel like that and it’s nothing like my greatest fears.I don’t feel ashamed and I don’t feel embarrassed. I feel extremely proud and honoured that everyone stuck by my side. I’m extremely proud I’m going out with my head held high. My staff are very loyal and are extremely upset. It’s a very sad day, but at the same token it’s made it very much easier to know I’m very loved and respected.’

— Joel Taylor

Excellent write up by Joel Taylor of the last moments of The Alma. He has exposed the myth that pubs are closed by bad landlords. Pubs are not closed by bad landlords, pubs are closed by bad pubcos.

The first I knew the bailiffs were moving in was when an alert went out Thursday night, which I was only too happy to re-tweet. And as we can see from Joe Taylor’s excellent article, people turned out Friday morning.

This is how thug Ted Tuppen, chief executive of Enterprise Inns, treats hard working pub landlords, destroys their businesses, kicks them out of their homes, then either finds another mug to lose their life savings, or sells the pub on for redevelopment.

The Alma, until Kirsty took it over, was a pub to avoid. Kirsty put her heart and soul, worked her socks off, into building up the reputation of The Alma. She turned a pub to avoid into a pub worth visiting.

Enterprise is a zombie company, it does not make a profit, it is in debt and can barely meet its interest payments. It screws pub landlords by charging overinflated rents, by forcing them to buy their drinks from the pubco at often near double the market rate. As a result the pub fails. When the pub fails, the pubco either finds another mug to lose their life savings or where the pub occupies a prime site, sells the pub for redevelopment.

Greg Mulholland MP, chairs the All Party Pub Group. During a recent House of Commons debate he described the two largest pubcos, Enterprise and Punch Taverns, as ‘zombie companies’ which do not pay dividends and ‘have no growth plan or export potential’.

Greg Mulholland added: ‘They just about pay the cost of their debt by selling off their assets. That asset stripping is happening now – slash and burn.’ He said that between them, these two pubcos ‘collectively disposed of more than 5,000 pubs between 2008 and 2012 – one third of all their pubs’.

The bailiffs turning up at The Alma Friday morning, is but one example of the slash and burn policy of Enterprise.

Ted Tuppen, for heading a failing pubco, received a basic salary of £640,000, a bonus of £329,000 and pension contributions of £160,000 last year.

In 2009, a Parliamentary select committee looked into pubcos.

According to an article in Private Eye, the select committee asked 1,000 publicans for their opinions regarding their experiences working with Britain’s largest pubcos, which includes Enterprise Inns. The Eye states that the committee’s findings had “at last shed light on an industry in freefall, with 40 pubs closing every week. Pubcos are essentially greedy property companies with a cuddly name – and they own nearly half the country’s pub freeholds.”

The Committee commissioned its own independent survey as part of its inquiry, to determine whether the negative evidence it initially received from lessees was typical of feelings in the industry.

The survey results, printed with the Committee’s evidence, underpinned the Committee’s findings. 64 per cent of lessees did not think their pubco added any value and while a fifth had had a dispute with their pubco, few (18 per cent) were satisfied with the outcome. The Committee was astonished to learn that 67 per cent of the lessees surveyed earned less than £15,000 pa and over 50 per cent of the lessees who had turnover of more than £500,000 pa earned less than £15,000 – a 3 per cent rate of return. The lessees may share the risks with their pubco but they do not appear to share the benefits. The report therefore concludes that problems which were identified by the Trade and Industry Committee four years ago remain. An imbalance of bargaining power between lessees and pubcos persists and the arrangements for assessing rents remain opaque. Rental assessment should be the basis for negotiation, but incumbent lessees often risk the loss of their home as well as their business if they cannot reach agreement, the report says.

The Eye says the committee found that pubco tenants are initially attracted to run pubs by low entry costs, but soon find that making a decent living is very difficult. Tenants’ leases oblige them to buy alcoholic drinks from nominated suppliers at up to twice the open-market price. If a struggling tenant leaves, another tenant can be found to replace them. In the years of booming property prices this practice was successful, but is much less so now, as evidenced by the number of pub closures. The Guardian reported that MPs found an imbalance of power that can amount to “downright bullying” between the big pubcos, such as Enterprise Inns and Punch Taverns, and their tenants In 2008, one tenant who felt forced to close the pub he ran with his wife said:

We told Enterprise [Inns] we were struggling and needed some help; they didn’t come forward with any. If we were late paying bills we would get threatening phone calls. They could have put a hold on the rent or given us a discount until we managed to get business back up. If we didn’t pay bills on time they wouldn’t deliver the beer and when they did deliver it they would charge us for carriage. Instead of helping us they were making it worse.

The MPs wished to see a ban on pubcos selling pub premises with restrictive covenants that prevent them being used as pubs in the future. Ted Tuppen claimed a need for covenants, saying there are too many pubs in some areas and Enterprise used restrictive covenants “because, genuinely, we think these are pubs that have lived their life”. However, he admitted that 70% of Enterprise sales have such covenants in place.

The select committee was not generally impressed by the pubcos’ senior executives, rebuking them for having given “partial” and even “false” evidence to the committee.

Battle for The Alma

November 2, 2013
The Alma

The Alma

The Alma is my business, my home and for the past 11 years everything I do. – Kirsty Valentine

Pubs are destroyed for many reasons, bad landlords for example. They are though in the main, destroyed by pubcos, who are screwing pub landlords, then when the pubs fails, it is sold off for redevelopment.

Pubs are not failing because people sit at home, as a ridiculous article in The Telegraph suggested.

The c 1720s Tumbledown Dick was a popular live music venue until it closed in 2008. Since left to rapidly deteriorate thanks to wilful neglect by Bride Hall and refusal to serve enforcement action by the Rotten Borough of Rushmoor.

The Alma, a Victorian pub in  Newington Green in Islington, was a pub to avoid, until Kirsty Valentine took it over and turned it around from a pub to avoid to a pub to visit, Kirsty Valentine is now facing bankruptcy. Not because she cannot run a successful pub, but because she is being screwed by zombie pubco bully Enterprise Inns. The Alma now faces an uncertain future, possible demolition and redevelopment of the site.

Pubcos screw landlords in two ways

  • overinflated rents
  • overcharging for drinks, which have to be bought from the pubco not on the open market

Kirsty Valentine is forced to pay 40% higher price, than if she bought on the open market. She is also restricted in what she can buy and sell.

If you walk into a pub and wonder why they are selling rubbish when there are great beers around, why you are paying over the odds, then ask are they tied to a pubco, then you will have the answer.

The Alma are not through sitting idly by and letting the pubco walk all over them, they are fighting back.

Part of the Battle to save the Alma, is to seek a listing from Islington as an Asset of Community Value under the Localism Act.

To protect the future of The Alma we want Islington to recognise its status as an Asset of Community Value (ACV) under the Localism Act.  Registration of The Alma as an ACV will ensure that it cannot be sold for non-pub alternative uses without the knowledge of the pubs management or customers and must, by law, be offered to the community to buy it if they wish.
 
Pubs are widely recognised in the planning system as making a positive contribution to the residential conservation areas they sit in, both in terms of their visual appeal and the historic function they perform as meeting places for the communities they serve. ACV registrations are taken into account when planning applications on the building are made and can be grounds for refusal where this would strip the building of its use or result in its demolition.

Tourists come to London for our heritage. Part of that heritage is the traditional English pub, serving real ales and quality food. They do not come for tacky fast food outlets.

Pubs are local businesses, they recycle money within the local economy, support other local businesses.

There is certainly a strong argument to be made for the social and economic value of the community pub. IPPR in a recent report Pubs and Places: the social value of community pubs, placed the wider social value of a sample of community pubs at between £20,000 and £120,000 per pub. It noted that pubs inject an average of £80,000 into their local economy each year, besides their cultural and practical community value.

Please sign the petition calling for The Alma to be designated as an Asset of Community Value under the Localism Act.

The Alma was a battle fought in the Crimean war.

CVLA visits N1

December 23, 2010
Duke of Cambridge, Islington

Duke of Cambridge, Islington

On the night of the 22nd of December as part of the ongoing campaign to raise awareness of the selfishness, and ridiculous carbon emissions, of ‘Chelsea Tractors’ the CVLA paid a visit to the London borough of Islington.

In a flying visit, approximately 50 gas-guzzling, 4×4 ‘Islington Tractors’ had their license plates replaced with the more apt CO2 K1LL5.

Owners of these selfish vehicles, anywhere in the United Kingdom, can expect more visits from the CVLA over the coming months.

In 2007 domestic transport was the source of approximately 24% of the UK’s domestic CO2 emissions. Our cars contributed 58%, or 77.1 million tonnes, of this overall figure. If people need to drive, the CVLA suggest that a 5.0 litre, 4×4 tractor is a little over the top for our urban streets; even if they do have a light covering of snow. Switching to a less fuel hungry vehicle will slash fuel bills and carbon emissions.

In case any urban 4×4 drivers are feeling particularly brave, the CVLA also suggest alternative means of transport such as trains, buses, cycling and walking. These are popular methods of moving from A to B that don’t destroy the planet.

Posted by Climate Rush on their blog.

Also see

The rich have no more right to emit than the poor

Chelsea Tractors targeted