Posts Tagged ‘Indian coffee filter’

The Fourth Coffee Wave

February 14, 2021

We are seeing a fourth coffee wave. The first three waves were determined by the coffee consuming countries, the fourth wave determined by the growers and coffee shops and roasteries in the producing countries.

We see several examples of this, opening of speciality coffee shops, where the coffee shops and roasteries and farms work in close collaboration, the development of a coffee flavour wheel using local fruits, not northern fruits, El Salvador the first ever world champion barista from a producer country.

That a flavour may be distasteful irrelevant it is consistency that matters.

It is interesting that India has its own coffee filter equipment, made of brass, passed down through the generations. And yes, I would love to get my hands on one to try.

Where I have questions is on heat retention. A lid popped on after first bloom, water between 85 and 90 C, brass an excellent conductor of heat, a brew time of up to 15 minutes, is not the final brew lukewarm?

Is there similar in Ceylon?

Ceylon famous for tea, but once it was famous for coffee, tea replaced coffee when coffee leaf rust wiped out the coffee plantations.

Old surviving coffee trees have been found, at least a century old, the best coffee cherries selected, new trees planted, a nascent coffee industry. The roasted coffee shipped to a Ceylon Coffee House in England. Not ideal, and this is where I would disagree, it is best to ship the green beans than to roast at source. Too risky for the roasted beans they need to be fresh, and the expertise in the roasting not good enough.

A trial roast is being arranged in the UK. I cannot say more as coronavirus has put everything on hold.

But hopefully more than one coffee roastery, more than one variety, and in the coffee shop, Indian brass coffee filter would be interesting to try.

In Bali, the development of an Indonesian coffee flavour wheel. [see Drift no 9 Bali edition]

The coffee flavour notes remain the same, the difference, referenced to local sensory experiences.


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