Posts Tagged ‘Geisha’

Letty Bermudez

January 27, 2022

As (when we can) we label our coffees with the names of the producer, and that Diego’s name was already taken we actually reached out to Diego again if he would like to name this after someone special to him. Letty is the name of his youngest daughter. — Manhattan coffee roastery in Rotterdam

Letty Bermudez the name of the coffee, the name of the daughter of the grower Diego Bermudez.

A Geisha from Finca El Paraiso, grower Diego Bermudez in Colombia.

There is a trend with Geisha, to process in weird and wonderful ways, to push the boundaries, Letty Bermudez no exception, double fermentation thermal shock.

Rather than try to explain I will quote the roastery Manhattan based in Rotterdam.

Around 12 months ago we reached out to Diego Bermudez about commissioning a special lot of high end coffee specifically designed for us.

The conversation between Ben and Diego went something like this.

B – “…I don’t know if the numbers reflect the method but whatever it is, well done. I’d be curious to see what your absolute limit on a coffee would be, would it be possible to commission that?”

D – “Yes, I’ll send you the sample in two weeks”

Three weeks after that conversation we received a sample of one of the most insane geisha’s that has ever been on our cupping table at MCR. The processing is a combination of aerobic (60 hours in a pressurised tank), anaerobic (36 hours in mucilage at 18c with the addition of Leuconostoc bacteria), thermal shock and the Enigma dryer (a circular drying system) for 29 hours reaching a final humidity of 10%.

As (when we can) we label our coffees with the names of the producer, and that Diego’s name was already taken we actually reached out to Diego again if he would like to name this after someone special to him. Letty is the name of his youngest daughter and Diego said “Our desire is that the second generation of our family of coffee growers can transcend history and can generate a new evolution and passion for coffee.” With coffee like this we don’t doubt that this truly will become a reality.

Expect the definition of yellow fruit.

Our most prominent notes were haribo peach, milky oolong and mango.

A filter coffee, brewed at Effy (thanks to barista Mitch) using an Origami with Origami filter paper.

Tasting notes strange, I found it was as though I was drinking watered down fruit juice.

I think I am going to have to buy a bag, expensive €22, and have a play. Although roasted for filter I am curious, what is it like as espresso?

variety: Geisha

single origin: Finca El Paraiso, Cauca Piendamó, Colombia

altitude: 1960masl

processing: double fermentation thermal shock

tasting notes: Haribo peach, milky oolong and mango

The best Panama Geisha of 2021?

June 18, 2021

Panama Geisha, Finca Deborah the best of 2021?

I am pleased Patrik Rolf then went on to qualify, one of the best coffees in the world.

In the same locality we have Hacienda La Esmeralda where Geisha was discovered or rediscovered, for more on this read God in a Cup, and the estate of Ninety Plus, located Boquete, Volcán and Renacimiento.

Several things struck me from the farm, Finca Deborah.

  • shade grown coffee
  • beautiful wooded hills
  •  coffee protects the environment
  • the care the farmer Jamison Savage takes with his coffee beans

I contrast the introduction looking at the green beans with green beans I was asked to look at from Cameroon. The Cameroon beans had insect damage and black mould. When I tried to explain the condition of the beans was not acceptable, supplier became angry. Would not listen when I was trying to help, telling them if they wish to be taken seriously they have to address these problems, they cannot ship poor quality coffee beans.

I am pleased Patrik featured the farmer. Someone grows the beans, we need to know more about the farmers. Unless they care, we will not be drinking high quality coffee. We also need to thank the roastery and the person who brews our coffee.

We have our green coffee beans, how do we roast, how do we brew?

Slightly longer roast time, slightly higher roast temperature. This would appear to go against perceived wisdom, if we think of cheap crap commodity coffee, roast the shit out of it to hide any defects.

Then when we get to brewing, again contrary to perceived wisdom, leave to rest for three, four, five weeks.

And then, grind, store in an airtight container, brew the next day, which appears to go against perceived wisdom, grind and brew fresh for each cup, otherwise lose all the aromatic oils, coffee will oxidise.

Interesting to try, three different Geishas, same farm, same variety, different processing of the beans.

I recall something similar a couple of years ago, twelve different lots from the same farm, a cupping session at Taylor St Roasted.

I was tempted to order.

Synchronicity: Intrigued to stumble across this, of my friends at The Underdog, one of my favourite coffee shops in Athens, using beans from Finca Deborah for the World Barista Championship Boston 2019. It is always an honour and pleasure to be served a coffee at The Underdog and if time permits and not too busy conversation about coffee. If The Underdog rates this coffee, then Patrik Rolf is in very good company.

Foot note: I tried to order. Too late, Sold Out. 

V60 Martin Hudak Signature Geisha

September 1, 2017

V60 filter coffee Martin Hudak Signature Geisha roasted by Union Hand-Roasted brewed at Madame Waffle.

Most of the afternoon spent in Madame Waffle.

Excellent cappuccino, far better than the undrinkable cappuccino in Stokes on High Bridge a couple of days ago.

It was then a V60 using the Martin Hudak Signature Geisha that I had brought along as a guest coffee.

Water around 95 C, just off boiling.

First cleanse the filter with hot water, then throw away. This also warms the jug.

Wet the ground coffee, this allows it to bloom, releases carbon dioxide.

Pour water in a circular motion to agitate the coffee.

Then enjoy.

This was the coffee Martin Hudak used to win World Championship Coffee in Good Spirits, Budapest June 2017.

I had the honour of meeting Martin Hudak at Union Summer Carnival a few days after his winning the world championship, not only meeting but actually trying his award winning cocktail, a cocktail made with Geisha.

Geisha, a coffee from Panama, is one of the world’s highest rated coffees.

The Martin Hudak Signature Geisha has a Q rating of 91.

Geisha grows at high altitude, shaded by trees, as all the best coffees grow.

When it was discovered in Panama, the reaction of those who first tasted Geisha was that of discovering God in a cup.

For more on Geisha and its almost mystical status, God in a Cup is an absolute must read.

Kalita Wave Martin Hudak Signature Geisha

August 1, 2017

Kalita Wave filter coffee using Martin Hudak Signature Geisha from Panama roasted by Union Hand-Roasted Coffee.

I have been hanging on to this coffee since picking up from Union Summer Carnival, wanting to try and at the same time resisting.

But coffee like fresh fruit, cannot be left, it has to be used within an optimum period, and I was already passing that by.

Method a Kalita Wave. I could have tried V60 or Japanese syphon, it would be an interesting comparison.

  • 17 grams of coffee
  • 275 ml of water
  • 4 minutes

Water around 95 C, just off boiling.

First cleanse the filter with hot water, then throw away. This also warms the jug.

Wet the ground coffee, this allows it to bloom, releases carbon dioxide.

Pour water in a circular motion to agitate the coffee.

Then enjoy.

This was the coffee Martin Hudak used to win World Championship Coffee in Good Spirits, Budapest June 2017.

I had the honour of meeting Martin Hudak at Union Summer Carnival a few days after his winning the world championship, not only meeting but actually trying his award winning cocktail, a cocktail made with Geisha.

Geisha, a coffee from Panama, is one of the world’s highest rated coffees.

The Martin Hudak Signature Geisha has a Q rating of 91.

Geisha grows at high altitude, shaded by trees, as all the best coffees grow.

When it was discovered in Panama, the reaction of those who first tasted Geisha was that of discovering God in a cup.

For more on Geisha and its almost mystical status, God in a Cup is an absolute must read.

Next try as Japanese iced filter.


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