Posts Tagged ‘Easter’

Easter street food festival Lincoln Castle

April 20, 2019

Chow Down travelling circus Easter street food festival in the grounds of Lincoln Castle.

A pleasant walk along Minster Yard running south side of Lincoln Cathedral.

People enjoying the sun on the grass on the east side outside the Chapter House.

Passed through a farmers market in Castle Hill, with a mental note to return later, but first the street food festival in the grounds of Lincoln Castle.

Long queue to get in, £3 entry fee for what is usually free access.

Inside packed.

Dogs are usually welcome in the Castle grounds. Not today. Not acceptable no dogs. No street food festival I have a visited has barred dogs. But then can usually access and walk through the Castle grounds for free.

£3 entry fee, £5 for French fries, £3-10 takeaway coffee.

Recently a new shed has been built at the West Gate. Usually manned. When queried why build a new shed which is no longer manned, told only manned when pay to gain access to Castle grounds.

West Gate closed for Chow Down which hits local businesses either side of Lincoln Castle. Something Bailgate Guild must raise.

A problem for disabled, and possibly illegal. A car park at The Lawn, a ramp for easy access. West Gate closed.

Claimed to be largest street food festival in the country. Not true.

Street food market in Lower Marsh, South Bank street food market, Godalming street food market, Street Food Picnic in a park in Guildford a couple of years ago, all much larger, all far better street food.

The burger at the Guildford Street Food Picnic, grilled on a charcoal grill, served with a side of new potatoes.

Claimed 25% of the offering being either vegetarian or vegan. I did not see a single vegetarian stall let alone a vegan stall.

Claimed craft beer breweries from across the UK will be attending so you can sample some of the finest beers the country has to offer – whether it be draught or in cans.

Really? Where were they?

A craft beer stall, but nothing to say what was on offer. Same true of the beer tent. What was really weird, what was being served behind a partition to block sight of what was being served.

Later I had an excellent local craft beer off the farmers market outside.

Chow Down yet another travelling circus. A couple of weeks ago, a travelling circus of disgusting junk food in the the High Street.

Yes, Chow Down better than the junk food in the High Street but it would have had to have been pretty disgusting to be worse. Not a high bar to exceed.

They also appeared to have minimum environmental standards. Stalls using recyclable containers. Though then let down with no obvious bin for compostable waste. My burger served in a card box went in general waste. Only later did I see a bin for recycling. But saw no bin for compostable waste. I saw a grand total of two bins, with one young man going round collecting the rubbish ignorant people had tossed on the ground.

Chow Down also had better food offering than the disgusting offering at the Lincoln Vegan Festival a couple of weeks ago in the Drill Hall, though vegans and vegetarians would have been very disappointed by what was on offer.

I expected to be spoilt for choice. I was not.

I settled for a burger. It was good, but I have had far better. Dirty Organic Burger in Brighton, burger from street food festival in a park in Guildford a couple of years ago (and it was charcoal grilled and came with a side of new potatoes).

A cappuccino off Laynes Espresso coffee stall using Dark Woods Arboretum espresso blend. It too was good, far better than usually get at such events, undrinkable coffee served from a van and better than the undrinkable coffee served in the Lincoln Castle cafe which is to insult visitors, but not in the same league as Coffee Aroma or Madame Waffle.

And on a hot day, why no cold brew coffee? A very refreshing drink on a hot day.

Nor were the waffles on a waffle stall in the same league as Madame Waffle.

Laynes espresso claimed the Chow Down travelling circus was curated, in other words they have selected the best. If this was curated, I hate to think what it would have been if not.

If this is the best the North and Midlands has to offer on street food, then a poor reflection of street food culture in the region.

Not last year but the year before, Steam Punks had a far better street food offering.

I was there lunchtime, the Castle grounds were packed, and yet what was noticeable the food stalls were not busy.

There was better food on offer at the local farmers market outside the Castle in Castle Hill, from where I was also able to pick up an excellent local craft beer

After returning to the farmers market, where I found better food on offer, then walked down Steep Hill.

Drunks spilling out of the Magna Cart were blocking the street.

If Lincoln is to host a street food festival, then do not invite a travelling circus, organise own street food festival. If stalls not of quality, then do not invite again. For example, South Bank street food market has regulars, plus a couple of pitches for guest stalls.

Follow the example of Staycation Live in Godalming (underwritten by the local Town Council). Host in the Castle grounds a weekend of live free music in the summer, Lincoln BIG or the community fund that hopefully replaces Lincoln BIG as Lincoln BIG not fit for purpose underwrites, performers have their expenses covered, sell albums, and not only music, also drama and poetry, a collection for a worthy cause, street food, quality street food, around the periphery and dogs welcome.

Free summer weekend music festival in the grounds of Lincoln Castle, street food, finish at 2000 to give time to pack up in daylight, then continue in the evening in the town, for example Coffee Aroma street party, jazz with pizza from clay oven at Caffe Portico.

Easter in Prague

March 27, 2016
Easter in Prague

Easter in Prague

An Easter Market, sheds selling tourist tat everywhere.

Outside St Nicholas Church, a wonderful Easter Egg.

Easter Monday in the garden

April 6, 2015
daffodils

daffodils

primroses

primroses

wood anemones

wood anemones

After several cold days last week, today a marked change, sunny and lovely and warm.

Grass cut, it should have been cut at least a week ago, first cut of the season. Hard work when have not mowed the grass since last autumn.

Peas variety Onward sowed. Broad beans sowed in February are up, but no sign of peas variety Early Onward sowed at the same time in February.

A little digging.

I regret I was not up earlier and out earlier to make the most of a lovely sunny day.

Happy Easter

April 5, 2015

Twice yesterday, Saturday afternoon, I was greeted ‘Happy Easter’.

Once by an English friend, then later by a Nepalese (Buddhist) friend.

Is this a new trend, as never before have I been greeted ‘Happy Easter’?

Merry Christmas, Happy New Year, Happy Birthday, but never Happy Easter.

Christmas is marked by an orgy of obscene consumerism. Easter has tended not to be marked, apart from shops closing on Sunday (they used to close Good Friday).

There has though of late been an attempt to bring back Easter, processions in the street with a large wooden cross being carried, Passion Plays.

What has Easter eggs and rabbits got to do with Easter, asked my Nepalese friend?

She, as with most non-Christians, finds Christianity a perplexing mystery. If we are honest, so do most Christians, as they lack any understanding of the origins of their religion.

Absolute nothing, I said, and I have no idea where it has come from.

Triangle, a Christian bookshop was offering Real Easter Eggs.

What are real Easter eggs?

Painted white eggs?

In Lithuania, the eggs are painted, then at Easter smashed.

Easter eggs in Milk and Honey

Easter eggs in Milk and Honey

In Brazil, a tradition of painted Easter eggs.

Easter bunny and egg in Cyprus

Easter bunny and egg in Cyprus

In Cyprus, 2m high rabbits and eggs in the street.

We have Western Christians and Orthodox Christians celebrating Easter at different times of the year. For Orthodox Christians, Easter is not this weekend but next weekend.

And Easter is never the same date, it moves with the cycle of the moon.  The reason being is that, like Christmas, it is an adaption of pre-Christian festivities. It is easier to persuade people to celebrate a festival with a new name, than to force them to celebrate a new festival.

Seven Stanzas at Easter

April 29, 2013
The Sun - Edvard Munch

The Sun – Edvard Munch

Make no mistake: if he rose at all
It was as His body;
If the cell’s dissolution did not reverse, the molecule reknit,
The amino acids rekindle,
The Church will fall.

It was not as the flowers,
Each soft spring recurrent;
It was not as His Spirit in the mouths and fuddled eyes of the
Eleven apostles;
It was as His flesh; ours.

The same hinged thumbs and toes
The same valved heart
That-pierced-died, withered, paused, and then regathered
Out of enduring Might
New strength to enclose.

Let us not mock God with metaphor,
Analogy, sidestepping, transcendence,
Making of the event a parable, a sign painted in the faded
Credulity of earlier ages:
Let us walk through the door.

The stone is rolled back, not papier-mache,
Not a stone in a story,
But the vast rock of materiality that in the slow grinding of
Time will eclipse for each of us
The wide light of day.

And if we have an angel at the tomb,
Make it a real angel,
Weighty with Max Planck’s quanta, vivid with hair, opaque in
The dawn light, robed in real linen
Spun on a definite loom.

Let us not seek to make it less monstrous,
For our own convenience, our own sense of beauty,
Lest, awakened in one unthinkable hour, we are embarrassed
By the miracle,
And crushed by remonstrance.

— John Updike

The Resurrection

April 22, 2013

A detailed look at the various passages in the Gospels. A series of post-Easter talks by Canon Robert Cotton of Holy Trinity and St Mary’s.

Week II John and four paintings.

Anyone who knows God cannot describe Him. Anyone who can describe God does not know Him. — Paulo Coelho

If you can’t find god in the next person you meet, it’s a waste of time looking for him anywhere else —- Gandhi

When we look at painting of the resurrection, we have to ask ourselves: Did they read the Biblical passages, did they comprehend, how did they interpret?

Francesca, Piero Della - Resurrection - Renaissance (Early Italian, "Quattrocento") - New Testament - Fresco

Resurrection – Piero Della Francesca

A fresco, that when seen in situ, appears to leap out at you. Christ depicted rising, soldiers either asleep or looking fearful. The dress of Christ could be that of a Roman Senator, indicating someone of importance.

Noli me tangere - Alexander Ivanov (1835)

Noli me tangere – Alexander Ivanov (1835)

Noli me tangere, meaning “don’t touch me” or “touch me not”, is the Latin version of words spoken, according to John 20:17, by Jesus to Mary Magdalene when she recognised him after his resurrection. The original Koine Greek phrase, Μή μου ἅπτου (mē mou haptou), is better represented in translation as “cease holding on to me” or “stop clinging to me”.

In the Eastern Orthodox Church the Gospel lesson on Noli me tangere is one of the Twelve Matins Gospels read during the All Night Vigil on Sunday mornings.

Supper at Emmaus - Caravaggio (1606)

Supper at Emmaus – Caravaggio (1606)

Two of the disciples are looking at the bread. Know me by how I break bread. The third is looking at Christ with a puzzled expression. Christ female?

Emmaus - Emmanuel Garibay

Emmaus – Emmanuel Garibay

A seedy Filipino bar, lots of fun, the risen Christ a woman. Much focus on on pain, suffering, but here the focus is on joy. The painting formed part of an exhibition called Jesus Laughing and Loving.

 an exhibition called Jesus Laughing and Loving

an empty tomb

An empty tomb, the grave garments cast to one side.

In the first passage in John, we have the tomb found empty Mary Magdalene arrives first, then the men, a slight squabble between the men as to who got there first saw what.

But the men they arrive they see they go home. Is this not something of a let down? They find the tomb empty then simply go home!

Mary sees angels, has a chat with who she assumes to be a gardener. Do you not know who I am Mary?

Is there some significance in gardener? Is it not natural to assume the gardener, or a groundsman looking after the grounds?

Jesus appears before the men who are locked away in hiding. Thomas is not there, but when he is told, he wants to see some evidence. Is it fair to call Thomas doubting? He has been told an incredible story, is it not reasonable to ask for some hard evidence, to see with his own eyes?

The Gospel accounts differ on detail, which makes them more credible.

That it is women who are the first witnesses, also makes more credible, as they could not have given testimony in court. If wished to fabricate a story would have had men first on the scene.

Emphasises the importance of women, especial of Mary Magdalene.

In the beginning was the word. The word has no gender.

In the Koran the first word is read, all on its own. That it is all on its own, it is interpreted as a command. But it does not say only men read. To read you need an education.

His friends, his comrades, do not recognise Him. They know Jesus the Man, but do not know the Risen Christ, the Christos. They walk with him, sit down to eat, it is only when he breaks the bread, they recognise who he is. Mary Magdalene was the closest, and she does not recognise, she mistook for the gardener.

Has there been so much change? Or maybe they were in a state of shock. They have seen a close friend, comrade, travelling companion brutally executed. Why would they recognise a few days later, if approached by someone they knew to be dead? It is something the mind would not accept.

Men and Women were created equal in his image. What is that image? Is it like one of those strange images that flips between two states as you look at it? If created equal in the same image, can the Risen Christ not be female?

Jesus the Man v the Risen Christ, a dichotomy that was to spilt the Ancient Church over the next few hundred years and much blood shed.

When he was alive, Jesus asked of his disciples: Who do they say I am?

Doubt, as expressed by Thomas, is to question. We should always question. Those who do not are bigots and fundamentalist, who kill and maim others because they do not share the same world view.

Last year BBC Radio 4 had an excellent series on doubt presented by a former Scottish Bishop, but sadly like many good programmes, they did not keep on-line, though I believe there may have been an accompanying book.

The Gospels speak of the Resurrection of Jesus, not of us.

Relevant Biblical passages: Mark 16:1-8, Matthew 28:1-20, Luke 24:13-35 and John 20.

Easter paintings in Farnham Parish Church

March 30, 2013
carrying the cross

carrying the cross

taken down from the cross

taken down from the cross

I came across these painting last week, but the church was too dark to see them properly.

Today it was much lighter.

They were not originals, which I would love to see. There was no information on them, or if there was, I did not see any.

I suspect they are Stations of the Cross, but if so I only saw eleven and there should be twelve, but I may have missed one.

Note: There are twelve, one is of the Last Supper.

I have always been impressed by Stations of the Cross in churches, as in each church, they are different.

Today there was a large wooden cross, which is not usually in the church. I assume it appeared yesterday, Good Friday.

Very cold day in Farnham

March 30, 2013
Farnham Parish Church

Farnham Parish Church

prayer cards for Paulo and Annie

prayer cards for Paulo and Annie

candles  for Paulo and Annie

candles for Paulo and Annie

The Alchemist special edition

The Alchemist special edition

Unlike last week in Farnham, no snow, but still very cold.

On the way there the sun came out for a brief spell. I thought just like spring, only it’s winter, then I thought no, it is spring, only just like winter.

Around the church, I though it is not that cold, no wind. But I think it must have caught the sun for a while and been out of the wind. As it was very cold when I left the church.

Inside the church, it was not as cold as last week, and much lighter. I tried photographing the Easter paintings they have. I tried last week, but too dark. It is a pity they are not originals, and no information about them.

Two candles lit, one for Paulo Coelho whose new book Manuscript Found in Accra has been released in time for Easter and for my lovely Greek friend Annie. At least, unlike last week, there were other candles to light from, and so I did not end up putting out the flames. Strange, all the candles appeared to have bene lit before. Two prayer cards writ.

On leaving the church, now very cold.

Last week, I picked up Manuscript Found in Accra ahead of publication. I wondered, would they change it for a special limited edition of The Alchemist. I saw it last week, and was thinking it was the special limited edition of The Pilgrimage which I had seen before Christmas. Yes, they would change it. Was The Pilgrimage available. No. Both it seems are rare limited editions, and so very pleased I did go back and change.

Late lunch in The Barn. Very sorry to hear they are moving, as a lovely building, but no one ventures down the alley, even though it is in the centre of town.

On leaving The Barn, even colder. Bus waiting, no long wait at the bus stop.

Banksy: Stations of the Cross

March 29, 2013
Banksy: Stations of the Cross

Banksy: Stations of the Cross

How appropriate for Easter, a Banksy entitled Stations of the Cross, but according to the Huffington Post, a fake Banksy.

Mary’s thoughts on her way to Calvary

April 6, 2012

My heart is broken,
As my beloved son comes to death,
Others mock him,
A crown of thorns forced on his head,
Rose bush thorns, sharp as holly like daggers digging in.

I can feel his pain,
Sharp splinters pushing in,
Heavy wood slowly slipping down,
The stony road prickling his bare feet, the hot, sandy, dusty path.

They’re shouting, and jeering,
The spiteful soldiers, in their rich armour,
Their secretive echo around my head,
Blood trickles down Jesus’ straggled hair.

I have no choice,
But to stare longingly at him,
I shall have to bear living without him,
Jesus has agreed and will not change his mind,
He will take the hard and painful way, to be crucified.

I have hope,
That Jesus will enjoy a grand, new life,
And God’s plan to change the world will succeed,
People will change and live a better life,
And Jesus, my son will have given his life for us.

Written by a year 3/4 (age 7-9 years old) pupil at St Mark’s Primary School.

Published in St Mark’s Parish Magazine (March-April 2012).

A celebration of Holy Week at St Mark’s by the children
Reflection on The Nail at St Mark’s
The Cross