Posts Tagged ‘Colombia’

Colombia Coffee Roasters

June 20, 2019

Ideal place for a coffee shop thought I as I wandered through Oxford Covered Market, and no soonest had this thought occurred as if by magic one was conjured up.

A board said artisan coffee. They all claim artisan, gourmet is another, means nothing.

A fool was giving the barista a hard time, whilst at the same time blocking customers.

I ordered a cappuccino. It was excellent. Long chat with a Colombian lady, the owner, whose family own a farm in Columbia from where sources her beans from adn from other farms she knows.

Knowledgeable and professional staff.

What I liked which I have not come acrioss before, an intern from Latin America, learns the coffee shop side of the coffee trade, improves her English.

Cappuccino and pour over guest coffee at Café Amárena

May 21, 2019

Café Amárena located in the centre of Protaras, one of only two coffee shops in Protaras serving specialty coffee, the other Miyu Coffee overlooking Fig Tree Bay.

Very rare examples of quality coffee in Cyprus.

https://twitter.com/keithpp/status/113095268152112332

First a cappuccino using Café Amárena house blend.

We then tried a Colombian guest coffee from Cartwheel Coffee using three different pour over methods, Clever Dripper, Chemex and V60.

I have never liked Clever Dripper, it always appears as a cheap nasty copy of V60. But I have to admit, proof of the pudding, does it brew a good coffee? The answer, no. That brewed with the Clever Dripper did not do justice to the Colombian coffee.

It was then the Chemex v V60.

Initially I preferred the V60, but as the coffee cooled, my preference switched to the Chemex.

Many thanks to head barista Antonis Voukkalis.

Finca El Tormento

December 1, 2017

Tormento Colombia is a single origin coffee from Finca El Tormento in Colombia.

I passed by FCB kiosk on Guildford Station on my way to catch the train. No time to stop, other than say hi. Try our guest coffee next time you pass by.

This I did next time I passed by.

The Colombian coffee was excellent. One of the best coffees I have had at FCB kiosk.

Odd though, no information on the bag apart from an interesting drawing and the name, Colombia Tormento.

A little sleuthing and I learnt the guest coffee was supplied by Dark Woods Coffee.

varieties

Castillo, Colombia and Caturra.

estate

Finca El Tormento located at a height of 1,750 – 1,850 metres above sea level in the mountains of Southwest Antioquia is owned by Oscar Montoya Vazques.

The hand-picked cherries are dry pulped, fermented and washed, then sun dried on raised beds (parihuelas).

FCB kiosk

Guest coffee at FCB kiosk on Platform 2 at Guildford Station.

tasting notes

Citrus flavours and nutty caramel.

Northern Coffee Adventure

One does not expect a rail company to take passengers on a tour of a a coffee roastery, and yet that is exactly what Northern Rail did, to a few specially invited passengers.

During their visit, a very very special treat. They had a taste of  lot #227 from an estate in Panama. This scored a Q grade of 97, and  was sold at auction for a mind boggling $5000 per kilogram.

Synchronicity. Taf serve Ninety Plus coffee, coffee with a Q grade in excess of 90. Whilst there I had the great honour of being introduced to World Barista champion Stefanos Domatiotis. He showed me some beans that he said was from their estate in Panama. He then made me a V60 using Geisha from their Panama estate. The same estate that produced  lot #227. Was I served the same coffee? I do not know.

V60 The Little Tractor Coffee Shop

August 23, 2017

V60 filter coffee Finca Immaculada Laurina de Colombia roasted by Union Hand-Roasted Coffee brewed at The Little Tractor Coffee Shop.

Late morning in Lincoln, thunderstorm and heavy rain, then muggy and warm.

After checking out a few more Lincoln Knights, I looked in Makushi, picked up two Florentines, very rare to find, then to The Little Tractor Coffee Shop for a cappuccino.

Cappuccino was excellent.

The main reason for my visit, I had promised to bring in a guest coffee, Finca Immaculada Laurina de Colombia roasted by Union Hand-Roasted Coffee.

It was a case of make do.

A V60, but no carafe.  Make do with a pouring pot.

A hand grinder.

Although there was fine drizzle, we decided, once the coffee had been ground and the filter washed through with hot water, to brew in the Secret Garden out the back of Bird’s Yard.

First wet the filter with hot water. This removes any paper residues and heats the filter and carafe.

If in doubt why cleanse the filter, try drinking the hot water.

Add the ground coffee, tapping to ensure the bed is as flat as a billiard table.

Next pour in hot water close to boiling, allow the ground coffee to bloom. This enables the CO2 to escape.

Next pour in the hot water, just off boiling, in a rotating motion.

All steps are carefully weighed, timed, the coffee a precise grind, courser than for an espresso machine.

How to enjoy is personal preference. I prefer a glass to showcase the colour of the resultant liquid.

Finca Immaculada is a garden farm located at a height of 1770–2040 metres, surrounded by a National Park. The coffee plants grow in the Andes in the shade of trees.

Laurina seeds originate from the tiny island of Réunion, east of Madagascar and south west of Mauritius, where a red bourbon variety mutated into this rare variety, the Bourbon Pointu.

The Little Tractor Coffee Shop is located in Bird’s Yard at the bottom of Steep Hill.

Walk through the shop to find the Secret Garden, a quiet little garden in which to relax with a coffee.

V60 Finca Immaculada Laurina

August 18, 2017

V60 filter coffee Finca Immaculada Laurina de Colombia roasted by Union Hand-Roasted Coffee brewed at Madame Waffle.

A morning in Lincoln, most of it spent in Madame Waffle, part of the Lincoln coffee scene.

First an excellent cappuccino.

It was then try a V60, Finca Immaculada Laurina de Colombia, roasted by Union Hand-Roasted Coffee, which I had brought along.

First wet the filter with hot water. This removes any paper residues and heats the filter and carafe.

If in doubt why cleanse the filter, try drinking the hot water.

Add the ground coffee, tapping to ensure the bed is as flat as a billiard table.

Next pour in hot water, allow the ground coffee to bloom. This enables the CO2 to escape.

Next, pour in the hot water, just off boiling, in a rotating motion.

All steps are carefully weighed, timed, the coffee a precise grind, courser than for an espresso machine.

The ratio of coffee to water, 1 to 60.

  • 17.5 g of coffee
  • 273.6 g of hot water

How to enjoy is personal preference. I prefer a glass to showcase the colour of the resultant liquid.

To brew, there was a choice between a V60 and a Chemex.

V60 is best suited to bring out the best from a natural process light roast bean.

Finca Immaculada is a garden farm located at a height of 1770-2040 metres, surrounded by a National Park. The coffee plants grow in the Andees in the shade of trees.

Laurina seeds originate from the tiny island of Réunion, east of Madagascar and south west of Mauritius, where a red bourbon variety mutated into this rare variety, the Bourbon Pointu.

Madame Waffle has Caffeine available for free, and one of the few places in the country where must have Standart is on sale.

Madame Waffle also serves waffles.

Special thanks to Bruce for kindly brewing and sharing his expertise.

WoodShares

April 16, 2015
WoodShares

WoodShares

What backs a currency?

We used to have gold coins, silver coins.

Some would say, the intrinsic value of the coin was its content, but this was not true, it was the symbol on the coin.

The symbol was the value, by common consent the value.

A ten euro note, is only ten euros by common consensus as to the value.

Symbols can be digits on a computer, can be a crypto-currency like BitCoin or StartCoin or FairCoin.

There are those who wish to revert to the gold standard, a currency backed by intrinsic value.

We could though turn this around, the gold has value because it is easily convertible.

Gold is not that useful. Try carrying around ingots of gold.

Bushels of wheat, cows, all can all be a currency.

A currency has two basic functions, two side of the coin we could say:

  • store of value
  • medium of exchange

When we wish to acquire something, we can barter, you have what I want, I have what you want, but only works if these two conditions satisfied.

With a medium of exchange, we can agree to buy or sell.

Store of value has problems, hoarding, accumulation.

Whatever our currency is based upon, we will try to maximise.

What if our currency was based upon forests? We would increase our wealth by maximising forests.

This is what WoodShares attempts to do, at least it could, only it does not.

If I go to a bank and say I want to borrow a million dollars to buy a forest, the bank will ask me what I wish to do with the forest. If I reply nothing, the bank will show me the door. If on the other hand, I say I wish to cut down the forest, sell off the timber, develop the land, show the bank what return I will make on my one million dollars investment, the bank will ask me are there any other woods I wish to buy.

WoodShares is a commercial forestry operation. Buy land, begs the question what was there before and being displaced. Participate in the discredited carbon trading operation. At the end of the cycle, when the trees have been harvested, ie clear felled, sell off the degraded land.

WoodShares therefore far from being a currency backed by a natural asset, is in reality a crowdfunded commercial forestry project. Neither is WoodShares a green project.

Sharing the spoils

October 23, 2014
protest against Nicaragua trans-ocean canal

protest against Nicaragua trans-ocean canal

protest outside BHPBilton AGM at coal mining in Colombia

protest outside BHPBilton AGM at coal mining in Colombia

Bolivia: Gap between rich and poor narrowed, unemployment halved, reduction in those living in extreme poverty.

Brazil: Reduction of those living in extreme poverty by 65% in a decade.

Venezuela: Reduction by half those living in extreme poverty, college enrolment has doubled.

Ecuador: Extreme poverty reduced by a third.

Argentina: Urban poverty halved.

But is has been achieved by sharing the spoils.

Peasants Revolt, French Revolution, Russian Revolution. a fight as to who shares the spoils.

Cutting down the rain forests and giving the man wielding the chainsaw a greater share of the spoils.

Better than Africa where a tiny elite divvy out the spoils, and most drains out of the country.

But all is based on growth, dirty extractive industries, cutting down the rain forests.

Ecuador has a growing dependency on oil exports, including from the Amazon

Bolivia a huge dependency on natural gas.

Argentina open cast mining and green deserts of genetically modified crops.

Brazil mega-dam projects and off-shore drilling.

Those who suffer worst from these projects are the rural poor and indigenous people. They lose the land, their forests, see their watercourses polluted.

And we all lose when global temperatures rise above 2C and we face thermal runaway over which we will have no control.

In Brazil, there has been many legal challenges against the mega-dam projects.

It is no different to what went before, growth, trashing the planet.

Dirty extraction is not of course limited to Latin America.

Statoil, is investing in tar sand and Arctic drilling.

In Greece gold mining.

There has to be genuine change and a move away from a model of growth and unsustainable dirty extraction. Otherwise all we are doing is re-arranging the deckchairs on the Titanic to give everyone an equal view of the iceberg.

Geografías

July 25, 2012
Colombian poet Mauricio Contreras

Colombian poet Mauricio Contreras

My song inscribes vast geographies, burning chronicles.
Land without memories, skilful in the trade of insomnia and death.
By a fire of thorn bushes a barefoot people forge bronze statues of silence.
Secret dice encode their torment.
I carve my voice on the wind, the sand sustains it.
A rebel, taking my stand on dreams, facing death and his pale banners.

From a sequence of prose poems Geografías in En la Raiz del Grito (At the Root of the Cry) by Colombian poet Mauricio Contreras.

The poems written in the 1980s tell the story of the drugs wars in Colombia in the 1980s, when two groups, intellectuals and peasants, were caught between the drug barons, the left-wing guerillas and the right wing para-militaries.

These few lines are cited by Grevel Lindop in his delightful book Travels on the Dance Floor. Mauricio Contreras is a poet he meets in Bogotá.

Mauricio Contreras Hernández (1960 – ). Nacido en Bogotá en 1960. Autor de los libros de poemas Geografías, En la raíz del grito, De la incesante partida, Devastación y memoria (Antología). Su libro mas reciente La herida intacta, obtuvo el Premio Nacional de Poesía “Ciudad de Bogotá-2005”. Como traductor ha publicado los libros La poesía está muerta, juro que no fui yo, del poeta portugués Jose Paulo Paes; Dos poetas en lengua inglesa, versiones de los poetas Owen Sheers y Vikram Seth y Dos mujeres y una lengua, versiones de las poetas Menna Elfyn de Gales y Tishana Doshi de la India. También ha escrito y publicado en diversos medios de Colombia y el exterior numerosos ensayos. Además se desempeña como investigador en pedagogía, campo en el que ha publicado varios libros. Ha recorrido el país realizando talleres con docentes y estudiantes.

La Tierra Del Olvido | Playing For Change

April 5, 2012

Over 80 musicians across Colombia.