Archive for the ‘Lincoln’ Category

The Green Cottage

September 17, 2018

Wandering around Louth I could only find two places to eat, a pie shop and a tea shop. I settled on the tea shop

Celery and cashew soup excellent. As was the quiche with salad and new potatoes.

The coffee awful. Poor quality catering supply coffee, someone clueless on how to make coffee. Chocolate dumped on a cappuccino, the cappuccino froth and foam with a small amount of insipid coffee at the bottom of the cup. I was spooning the foam out.

— to be continued —-

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Afternoon in Louth

September 17, 2018

Louth is a small market town in the foothills of the Lincolnshire Wolds, an hour by bus from Lincoln.

Main feature of interest, St James’ Church in the centre.

Monday quiet, few people around, many shops shut, too many have closed down, even the local newspaper closed down, a town that appears to be dying.

Caffe Nero moved in, local tea shops hit hard. What does that say of the local tea shops if they lose custom to Caffe Nero?

A handful of foodie shops worth knowing about, a deli near the church,a workers coop, a cheese shop. But although the deli near the church had Dark Woods coffee, it was ground, not freshly roasted and not the coffee they served. The cheese shop tea from Lincoln tea and coffee, which if anything like their poor quality coffee, will not be good.

Stokes as in Lincoln, has more or less a monopoly on tea shops serving their coffee, which means no quality coffee. One tea shop made the point they did not use Stokes, another is getting rid of Stokes as the service poor.

An ice cream parlour on the way to the bus station, ice cream ok, not good. Coffee would not say, others may jump in the act. This is laughable. If have quality coffee, prod to say where it comes from. Impressive but pricey bouquets made from cupcakes.

Places to eat a little tea shop and a pie shop.

Celery and cashew soup excellent. As was the quiche with salad and new potatoes. The coffee awful. Poor quality catering supply coffee, someone clueless on how to make coffee. Chocolate dumped on a cappuccino, the cappuccino froth and foam with a small amount of insipid coffee at the bottom of the cup. I was spooning the foam out.

One place that looked interesting, Auction House, had sadly closed.

The Auction House would be ideal for a speciality coffee shop, something Louth lacks and needs.

Excellent local strawberries in the front of a greengrocer, but when I popped back, dispaoointed to find sold out.

A tea shop that I had looked in, it called itself a coffee shop, but in reality and cafe serving paninis and catering supply coffee, closed at 3-30, many others including shops by four.

The streets interconnected by little alleys, one Pawnshop Passage led to a little sweet shop, Jassies.

Name to fame of Louth, the Greenwich Meridian passes through.

— to be continued —-

Heritage Open Day Lincoln Cathedral

September 15, 2018

Heritage Open Day, the one day of the year free entry to Lincoln Cathedral, unless of course attend a service.

Rather than walk up the High Street, up The Strait, up Steep Hill, I took a different route. Along Sincil Street (sadly trashed by the local Council in cahoots with the local Coop), over the River Witham, up past The Collection, then Well Lane which brings out on Steep Hill a little past Base Camp.

To my pleasant surprise, a farmers market in Castle Hill, held the third Saturday of the month.

Spending time on the market meant I had very little time to wander around Lincoln Cathedral.

I noticed seats laid out, each labelled. Front row, County Council chief executive, chairman, and other County Council jobsworth, then rows Lincoln City Council, then RAF, then cadets, and almost as an afterthought, a few seats for the public.

I asked. A Battle of Britain Commemorative Service 3 pm on Sunday.

Where then the seats for Veterans? And was the priority not wrong? Should not the worthless parasites be at the back, Veterans on the front row, followed by RAF?

Inquiries were made. Veterans were not even aware of the Service.

Castle Hill farmers market

September 15, 2018

I was on my way to Lincoln Cathedral. Heritage Open Day, the one day of the year free entry to Lincoln Cathedral, unless of course attend a service.

Rather than walk up the High Street, up The Strait, up Steep Hill, I took a different route. Along Sincil Street (sadly trashed by the local Council in cahoots with the local Coop), over the River Witham, up past The Collection, then Well Lane which brings out on Steep Hill a little past Base Camp.

To my pleasant surprise, a farmers market in Castle Hill, held the third Saturday of the month.

A wide choice of stalls, a marked contrast to the pathetic market held in the High Street on a Friday, now alternate Fridays, all of two stalls, three stalls if lucky, half a dozen stalls if very lucky.

I would question that Bailgate Deli having a stall, unless to make up numbers, as nether a grower nor a producer.

As with too many markets, low environmental standards, food served in plastic containers. What though was in many ways worse, two organic stalls with produce in plastic, as they should have known better.

I stopped and chatted with one of the organic stalls about their use of plastic, an organic growers association.

A guy on the stall also drinking poor quality coffee in plastic-lined takeaway cup.

There is absolutely no excuse for use of plastic on market stalls or from food stalls, as alternatives exist. Whoever is responsable for this market must set higher standards.

Off a bread stall, scones, OK, not great, sweetcorn off the organic produce stall excellent. Excellent cheese from Cote Hill.

Nothing off Redhill Farm as visited their shop in Bailgate, where a wider choice.

After visiting Lincoln Cathedral, cappuccino from Base Camp then a V60 from Madame Waffle from their excellent choice of guest coffees.

The way to enjoy coffee, is relax and enjoy out of glass or ceramic. But had I a takeaway, compostable takeaway coffee cup that can then be dropped on a compost heap.

Evidence in Camera

September 7, 2018

Art exhibition by Mandy Lee Jandrell at The Usher Art Gallery at The Collection.

One room, coloured lights bouncing of mirrors, another room two large screens, images of light used for signalling.

Evidence in Camera takes its title from the book of the same name by Constance Babington-Smith, published in 1957.

Constance Babington-Smith was head of Photographic Interpretation at RAF Medmenham’s Central Interpretation Unit, she was one of several women – including the archaeologist Dorothy Garrod – involved in the highly skilled interpretation of aerial reconnaissance photography during the Second World War.

Stokes at The Collection

September 4, 2018
Stokes at The Collection

Stokes at The Collection

I have in the past looked in on Stokes at The Collection, but never had a coffee.

Visiting an exhibition at The Collection, Bastion in the Air, I decided to take a break and have a cappuccino and a cookie.

Service was slow, even though Stokes at The Collection was empty.

The coffee when delivered, looked disgusting, tasted disgusting. The girl serving completely clueless on coffee.

When the coffee was brought to my table, I did not touch it for a couple of minutes, so disgusted by its appearance. When I did, I found it to be scalding hot. It must have been nigh on 100C when brought to the table.

Not helped by poor quality, over-roasted catering supply coffee.

The only good think I could say of the undrinkable cappuccino was that it did not have chocolate dumped on top.

I have had cookies at Stokes on High Bridge and they used to be excellent, the same can not be said of the coffee. The cookie was not good either, hard and dried up.

There are better coffee shops nearby, Base Camp on Steep Hill, Madame Waffle in the High Street and Coffee Aroma in Guildhall (through The Stonebow), all within a few minutes walk.

Stokes is an old family fourth generation coffee business. They have three coffee shops in Lincoln. Stokes on High Bridge, Stokes at The Collection, Stokes at The Lawn. Stokes at The Lawn is also a coffee roastery.

Bastion of the Air

September 4, 2018

The lamps are going out all over Europe, we shall not see them lit in our lifetime. — Sir Edward Grey, Foreign Secretary, 3 August 1914

An exhibition at The Collection, an arts cum museum complex, looking at Lincoln in World War One.

England was vulnerable, airships launched by the German Navy, dropping bombs on England, were untouchable, at too high an altitude to be reached by the existing British warplanes.

The next generation of planes could fly at higher altitude, and used incendiary bullets.

British aircraft were operated by the Army and the Navy. These were amalgamated to create the Royal Air Force.

Lincoln had three manufacturing plants, these were crucial to the war effort, and Lincoln became one of the centres of not only aircraft manufacture, but also of the engines and the bombs.

Lincoln was where at Fosters, the WWI tank was developed and built.

These engineering factories have long gone, in their place sheds on the inner-bypass selling worthless consumer junk, tacky chain coffee shops. Where once there was highly skilled well paid jobs, now temporary, part time, zero hours work.

Within the exhibition clothes, black and white film of the period, paintings (though no date or information on the artists), medals (including the Victoria Cross and German Iron Cross).

The first VC to be awarded was to a pilot William Leef Robinson for shooting down a Zeppelin airship.

Surprising no mention of the airship disaster at Washingborough. An airship was spotted, passengers rushed to one side of the Washingborough Ferry crossing the River Witham causing it to collapse.

The night before, a Zeppelin bombed Washingborough, mistaking for Lincoln. The Zeppelin was following a train, and may have thought it was Lincoln when the train stopped.

St John’s Church in Washingborough has unique Zeppelin Memorial Window put in by the Rector William Burland.

Note: No pictures thanks to copyright mafia.

If visiting the exhibition, visit the Tourist Information Centre in Castle Hill at the top of Steep Hill and pick up a 20% off voucher.

Also worth a visit, International Bomber Command Centre and the Museum of Lincolnshire Life.

Coffee at Stokes at The Collection is not recommended. There are better coffee shops nearby, Base Camp on Steep Hill, Madame Waffle in the High Street and Coffee Aroma in Guildhall (through The Stonebow), all within a few minutes walk.

AsylumX – Day 3

August 26, 2018

Welcome to the Asylum, a four day SteamPunk Festival in Lincoln, the largest known SteamPunk Festival in the solar system.

I cannot imagine how the clockwork of the universe can exist without a clock maker. — Voltaire

Day 3: The third day of AsylumX, a four day SteamPunk Festival in Lincoln.

Sadly a complete washout. A cold wet day, few people on the streets, street food gave up by lunchtime as no one about, the stalls on Castle Hill were forced by Council jobsworths to cease trading by mid-afternoon (previous day forced to cease trading at six when easily could have continued until seven).

This year, local shops take SteamPunk now in its tenth year seriously.

In Sincil Street, check out a charity shop, amazing SteamPunk creations.

A craft beer shop in the Strait, a special SteamPunk craft beer.

Near the top of The Strait, a wine shop with specially distilled SteamPunk gin.

Coffee connoisseurs are spoilt for choice with the Lincoln coffee culture, do not even think of going in any of the chains. Three coffee shops as walk from the town centre to Lincoln Castle.

Walking up the High Street, just after passing over the River Witham, turn left before passing through The Stonebow and find Coffee Aroma.

Pass through The Stonebow, up the High Street and find Madame Waffle.

Continue up the High Street, up The Strait, up Steep Hill, and as pass the cobbled section find Base Camp.

AsylumX a four day SteamPunk Festival over the Bank Holiday Weekend, Friday 24 August to Monday 27 August 2018.

AsylumX – Day 2

August 26, 2018

Welcome to the Asylum, a four day SteamPunk Festival in Lincoln, the largest known SteamPunk Festival in the solar system.

I cannot imagine how the clockwork of the universe can exist without a clock maker. — Voltaire

Day 2: The second day of AsylumX, a four day SteamPunk Festival in Lincoln.

Today, stalls in Castle Hill, in grounds of Lincoln Castle, many many steam punks. A food court open outside the Castle walls, street food, coffee van real ale, craft beer.

This year, local shops take SteamPunk now in its tenth year seriously.

In Sincil Street, check out a charity shop, amazing SteamPunk creations.

A craft beer shop in the Strait, a special SteamPunk craft beer.

Near the top of The Strait, a wine shop with specially distilled SteamPunk gin.

Coffee connoisseurs are spoilt for choice with the Lincoln coffee culture, do not even think of going in any of the chains. Three coffee shops as walk from the town centre to Lincoln Castle.

Walking up the High Street, just after passing over the River Witham, turn left before passing through The Stonebow and find Coffee Aroma.

Pass through The Stonebow, up the High Street and find Madame Waffle.

Continue up the High Street, up The Strait, up Steep Hill, and as pass the cobbled section find Base Camp.

AsylumX a four day SteamPunk Festival over the Bank Holiday Weekend, Friday 24 August to Monday 27 August 2018.

Lancaster Skies

August 25, 2018

A private showing of Lancaster Skies to veterans of Bomber Command and their guests at International Bomber Command Centre overlooking Lincoln Cathedral.

IBCC officially opened earlier this year, a centre, a digital archive, exhibitions and the Memorial Spire.

An appropriate setting for a private screening of Lancaster Skies.

A brief introduction by the producer, the film follows the lives of a Lancaster crew after they lost their skipper, a homagae to war films of the 1940s and 1950,

The film starts with a Lancaster being attacked by German night fighters, on landing they discover their skipper has been fatally wounded.

The crew are dysfunctional, can barely cope, they then have to cope with a new capatin, a rather aloof former fighter pilot.

The new capatin is keen to be in the air, take the fight to the Germans, the crew on the other hand are happy to remain grounded and send their time down the pub.

They are given a mission, in the same aircraft they last flew in now patched up. On their return they are again attacked.

The film is in black and white, the focus is on the crew.

The genre is less of the war films, more that of a series of working class films that were released in the 1960s, The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner, Saturday Night and Sunday Morning, A Taste of Honey all from the same film studio, Woodfall Films.

Whilst the film was being shown, a runner ran from IBCC to RAF Scampton and back.

Lancaster Skies will be shown in selected cinemas. Please lobby local cinemas if wish to see.