Archive for the ‘art’ Category

Knight of the Skies

April 23, 2017

Last year, cows started appearing all over Guildford. In Brighton it was snow dogs. In Lincoln it is Knights.

Bomber Command Memorial is rarely open, as work is still ongoing. Today was one of those special days when open.

Today a very special visitor, Knight of The Skies, kitted out as aircrew in WWII Bomber Command.

Designer of Knight of the Skies Rosie Ablewhite could not be present. Had she been, I would have complimented her on her interpretation.

I will not describe, other than to mention the sword, look carefully and will see it is the Spire, look again, and will see it is the same as the wingspan of an Avro Lancaster.

The sword is covered in corten steel, same material as the Spire and the concentric Memorial Walls.

Knight of the Skies is signed by the sole surviving member of the Dambusters Raid.

Knight of the Skies will move. He will be found at the top of Steep Hill, in Castle Hill, outside Lincoln Castle where he will be part of the Knights Trail.

Lincoln Knights’ Trail – 36 knights across Lincoln city centre – to celebrate the 800th anniversary of the Battle of Lincoln and the sealing of the Charter of the Forest.

According to Professor David Carpenter:

The Battle of Lincoln, one of the most decisive in English history, meant that England would be ruled by the Angevin, not the Capetian dynasty.

The Knights in Lincoln, cows in Guildford, snow dogs in Brighton, are part of a much larger project, Wild in Art.

Painting the ‘Knight of the Skies’

April 23, 2017

Rosie Rockets

You may remember the Lincoln Baron’s Trail in 2015 where I was fortunate enough to have a couple of designs chosen. Well this year, there’s yet another ‘Wild in Art’ trail to celebrate the 800th Anniversary of the Battle of Lincoln and the sealing of the Charter of the Forrest. This time there’ll be 36 Knight Statues around the City of Lincoln, from May 20th – September 3rd 2017. At the end of the trail in October, they’ll once again be auctioned off, raising money for the Trussell Trust.

As soon as I heard news of another trail I submitted designs straight away, bearing in mind there were a few briefs for Aviation themes – a specialty of mine. I was delighted to hear that once my design was shortlisted I was able to produce a mini Knight, giving myself a much better idea of the outcome. Good news kept…

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Stained glass workshop at Glassumimass

April 13, 2017

A stained glass workshop at St John’s Church in Washingbough, associated with though not part of Glassumimass, an exhibition of stained-glass lanterns.

I had no idea what to expect. Images of furnaces, molten glass, production of stained glass.

Er, not quite.

This was a session in production of stained glass panes.

I chose a wonderful complex piece.

No, no, I was told, far too difficult.

I also learnt I was looking at it the wrong way around.

We were given simple designs to try.

I decide to design my own piece.

A mistake, but I learnt the hard way.  I also learnt, no way could I have achieved the complex piece I had laid my eyes upon.

First choose pieces of stained glass from boxes of off cuts.

Nothing goes to waste in the world of stained glass, stained glass is expensive.

This was where I hit the first problem.

Without choosing a large off cut of stained glass, I could not find pieces large enough.

Choosing colours was abandoned, I thought vaguely abstract sea, maybe blood red sky.

Now it was down to find appropriate size pieces of stained glass.

These found, next stage was cutting the pieces to my pattern.

Not as easy as it looked.  I was not applying sufficient pressure to the glass cutter.

Straight lines not too difficult, but curves, and I had plenty of curves, much more difficult.

Breaking off the glass, once cut, was surprisingly easy.

But, my cutting was not too accurate the pieces did not fit together.

It was now a session on the grinder, a long session, to try and make up for my poor quality glass cutting.

It is also necessary to go all around each piece with the grinder, to establish a rough edge for the next stage.

But first, all the pieces to be washed and dried, to clean off any dirt and grease.

Next, apply a thin strip of copper tape all the way around each piece.

This was relatively easy, and practice improved.

Now already against the clock.

I did it too quick, the edges not centred on the tape.

Next smooth down the tape with a special tool, and the edges.

Now apply the solder.

Apply the solder, plus the copper tape, is what is known as the Tiffany process, named after Louis Comfort Tiffany (1848–1933) of New York who developed the copper foil process.

This too was relatively easy.

I cannot say I am too happy with my final stained glass, but, it was a first attempt, not bad for a first attempt, and now I have the hang of it, my next piece will be better.

If nothing else, next time I look at a stained glass window, I will now have a deeper appreciation of what I am looking at, the skills involved.

Many thanks to Marion Sanders of artsNK for all her help, and the lady who runs on a Thursday morning a stained glass workshop in the neighbouring village of Heighington.

Glassumimass a project of artsNK that has resulted in three glass lanterns inspired by local churches along Spires and Steeples Arts and Heritage Trail.

Glassumimass exhibition at St John’s until 23rd April 2017. It will then tour other churches on the trail.

The exhibition is open from 10am to 2pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, and from 12.30pm to 4.30pm on Saturdays and Sundays.

Washingborough is a small village three miles east of the city of Lincoln on the lower slopes of the limestone escarpment known as the Lincoln Edge where the River Witham breaks through the Lincoln Edge at the Lincoln Gap.

Glassumimass

April 9, 2017

An exhibition of stained glass at St John’s Church, Washingborough.

I was surprised at the length of durataion of the exhibition.

I queried this, and was told it was due to the fragility of the pieces and the reluctance to move them.

Good to find St John’s open.

11am until 1pm Thursday 17 April 2017, there will be a free stained glass workshop in the church.

Glassumimass a project of artsNK that has resulted in three glass lanterns inspired by local churches along Spires and Steeples Arts and Heritage Trail.

Exhibition until 23rd April 2017. It will then tour other churches on the trail.

The exhibition is open from 10am to 2pm on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, and from 12.30pm to 4.30pm on Saturdays and Sundays.

Washingborough is a small village three miles east of the city of Lincoln on the lower slopes of the limestone escarpment known as the Lincoln Edge where the River Witham breaks through the Lincoln Edge at the Lincoln Gap.

Ruddock’s to close after 163 years in business

March 4, 2017

Ruddock’s and Stokes on High Bridge are permanent features of Lincoln High Street.

Ruddock’s, a printer and a shop, the shop a bookshop, stationary, art supplies, upmarket pens, located in the top half of the High Street in Lincoln.

Or was, the printing business is to remain, the shop is to close.

Ruddock’s is to close after 163 years in business. A family business, the plan is to close in April 2017, 113 years in the present location, prior to that a little further up the High Street.

Henry Ruddock blames the lack of parking.

That is not the problem, the High Street is busy, there is footfall on the street, the problem is people are not passing through the door into the store.

I am sorry to see Ruddock’s close, but sadly not surprised, it lost its way years ago.

Lack of car parking in the town centre is simply an excuse. Yes, there is a problem of traffic congestion, solve that by improving public transport.

I see a High Street packed, but I see Ruddock’s empty.

But I would agree most of the developments within the city centre have been to the detriment of the town centre. For example the ugly high rise buildings, destruction of Sincil Street and the market, allowing motorised traffic through a pedestrianised city centre.

Ruddock’s used to be an excellent bookshop. Ruddock’s lost their way when they stopped selling books, though difficult to compete with on-line and Waterstone’s selling cut price best sellers, deals that are not offered to indie bookshops. Walk in now, and it is newspapers, magazines and rubbish.

Though first floor is a specialist art supplier.

Henry’s tea shop upstairs, is nicely done out, has atmosphere, but the coffee when I tried was not good. These days if open a coffee shop, ok it is a tea shop, you have to employ top class baristas and take a pride in the coffee you serve, not leave it to someone who makes the sandwiches. And how many passing by know there is a tea shop upstairs?

The tea shop will remain open or for the time being, but it is difficult to see how this will work if the shop is to close.

The tea shop is also placed at a competitive disadvantage when Starbucks and Caffè Nero dodge tax.

Ruddock’s also sells high quality pens, and I do not mean trendy rubbish Ted Baker as they promoted on twitter.

Montegrappa The Alchemist

Montegrappa The Alchemist

One of the rare shops I have found selling Montegrappa pens though not their top range, for example The Alchemist pen.

Lincoln will now have lost all its indie bookshops, or soon will have.

Readers Rest closed a couple of years ago. A great loss, and still missed.

Harlequin is going, driven out of business by a greedy landlord hiking the rent.

BookStop Cafe remains, local authors and second hand books, located in an undercroft beneath a Norman building with stunning view down Steep Hill.

Business rate hike is going to kill off many more indie businesses.

Development of Sincil Street has done an excellent job of driving out indie businesses. The street is now derelict. It used to be between ten in the morning and four in the afternoon busier than the High Street.

What is left? The same boring chains as seen in every town.

And where we do see indie coffee shops like Coffee Aroma, harassment from the County Council for leaving their tables and chairs outside in a pedestrianised area.

Yet what we see sadly is not only Lincoln, planners who care not for the local town, lack vision, lack understanding of town centre planning, and too often in the pocket of greedy developers.

When I attend a planning meeting and find a planner arguing on behalf of a greedy developer, dismissing any local objections, often quite well founded local objections, blatantly lying on the presentation, then I know something stinks.

And we only have to look at the results.

That is why time and time again, when English visit small towns across Europe, and still find the butcher, baker and indie bookshops, the historic centre free of traffic and unspoilt, they ask, why is my town not like this?

Libreria Palazzo Roberti

Libreria Palazzo Roberti

In Bassano del Grappa, a small town north of Venice nestling in the foothills of the Alps, we find traffic free streets, little shops, three indie bookshops, one of which is in a former palace where Napoleon once stayed.

Lincoln City Council, shedding crocodile tears, wringing of hands, not us guv.

Of course they are at fault, they are the planning authority hand in hand with Lincolnshire who are the Highways authority.

A classic case study in bad town centre planning.

And then have the gall to blame Lincoln for being a historic town. That is its attraction, there is nothing else of attraction. Or do they think people visit to admire the ugly buildings, to shop in the same shops as found elsewhere?

I fully back Henry Ruddock in his damning critique of the City Council.

Lincoln would make a case study in unimaginative, bad town centre planning.

Where I would disagree, is in the comments on car parking.

In the last decade or more we have seen ugly high rise buildings, each one uglier than the other.

Brayford is an eyesore.

This was an area of old warehouses and mills. This area could have been restored, to create an attractive and vibrant atmosphere, ground floor indie coffee shops and other indie businesses, first floor small businesses, design studios, hi-tech, top floors living accommodation.

Look to Bristol for an example.

A couple of years ago Sincil Street was thriving, between ten in the morning and four in the morning, it was busier than the High Street.

Now it has been blighted by development and sky high rents. And if look at the hoardings, more High Street chains, where once we had indie businesses.

Look to North Laine in Brighton, three streets each longer than Sincil Street, associated side streets, always busy, not a single chain, all indie businesses.

We see harassment of Coffee Aroma for leaving their tables and chairs outside, rather than deal with the real issue of stopping traffic through a pedestrianised area and delivering by handcart and trolley, as the norm in Europe.

Raices

November 27, 2016

Arte en si mismo.

Nudo ancestral.

Artist in Roman Agora

October 17, 2016
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artist in Roman Agora

This girl was producing an excellent sketch in her sketch book.

Kostas Nikolaou

October 17, 2016
Kostas Nikolaou

Kostas Nikolaou

Kostas Nikolaou, musician and photographer, exhibiting his works outside the Roman Agora

Aristotle

October 17, 2016
Aristotle

Aristotle

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Aristotle

Aristotle

Aristotle

Aristotle

Aristotle

Only in Athens the graffiti from Aristotle.

Rooted

July 23, 2016
Rooted

Rooted

Rooted, an art exhibition in St Mary’s.

Very much influenced by Salvador Dali and Pablo Picasso.

Unfortunate too many of the displayed works covered in glass, making impossible to see.