Synchronicity, The Barn and a singer-songwriter

Late lunch in The Barn. It had been raining but I seemed to have been lucky and missed it.

Very quiet, and had been all afternoon, but then not a lot of people about due to the bad weather.

Early evening, several people came in, including singer-songwriter Heather Golding. She had only intended to pop in for a couple of minutes, to say hi, until we got into conversation.

She told me she was planning a gig at Café Mila in Godalming with Geckko in early March.

She was quite suprised I knew of Geckko, or Café Mila.

I have never seen Gekko perform, but may have met them at The Barn.

Café Mila, it was I who suggested they have occasional live music, and was instrumental in their first gig, suggesting my lovely friend Annie, only it sadly fell through.

I said, hopefully, in June, they may have storyteller Steph Bradley, and told of her following her dreams, of being being inspired by Paulo Coelho, of sailing to Brazil, of reading The Alchemist and The Pilgrimage in Portuguese, of walking from village to town, town to village, in a pair of red flip flops from Brazil, of telling and collecting tales, all of which are writ in Tales of Our Times, a great volume of thirteen chapters and thirteen copies, because there are thirteen moons in a year, of an anthology of poetry, Searching for Love, to be published on leanpub on St Valentine’s day.

Heather was fascnated. I want to meet this storyteller, she said.

I then told her, contrary to popular misconception, The Alchemist was not the first book from Paulo Coelho, it was The Pilgrimage, an account of walking El Camino de Santiago, and that when you walk El Camino de Santiago, you have to give a gift, to give something back, and the gift from Paulo Coelho was The Alchemist.

Heather was fascinated, as only the day before, she had been discussing with her friend, walking El Camino de Santiago.

She could not believe it, when I then produced a copy of The Pilgrimage, which I gave to her as a gift.

You must know my story, she told me.

She was at a concert, with her daughter, then aged ten (she was on her way to see her daughter as we talked and had to keep calling her daughter to say she was late and on her way). A voice told her she had to get up on stage and sing. She had never sung in her life. Three times the voice told her, each time more powerful. She realised she had to obey, and much to her daughter’s embarrassment, walked up and on stage, and explained she had never sung, but could she sing with them.

She explained, she had literally come from picking up her latest album, and showed it to me. She said an internal image by mistake, had been printed upside down. And yet had worked out better.

I then told her of the cover art for Triptych II (Nine for a Kiss), was taken from a painting, but the painting, not the correct aspect ration for album cover art, until someone had the clever idea, of reflecting the painting.

I took her over to a cabinet, where there was some work on display by Chris Skillicorn-Aston. Oh yes, Chris, I know him, she said, I was only talking to him recently. I told her of how the cover art for The Way of the Bow, was take from the details of one of his paintings.

She said she would give me a copy of her latest album, but could not yet, as only a single copy on her, but I was welcome to her earlier album, Kutara, improvisation of voice and harp, recorded at St Andrew’s Church, the Parish Church of Farnham, I had passed earlier, but not gone in as I usually do. I thanked her, and asked, that she dropped off her latest album either at The Barn or Café Mila.

Her latest album, Elakoyah, I thinks she said came from the voice of dolphins, but maybe I misunderstood.

I said it was a must, she upload her music to bandcamp, in order that it could be shared and reach a much wider audience.

I explained to her the Gift Economy, as explained by Charles Eisenstein in Sacred Economics. People freely give gifts, with no expectation of return. A book I was introduced to by Steph Bradley.

After we bade our farewell, I settled in the corner with my Kobo Touch.

I wanted to try what I had thought of last night. Downloading e-books, from Kobo Store, is somewhat kack-handed, download into Kobo Library, then download from Library. Accessing Kobo Store from Kobo Touch using wifi in Harris + Hoole Friday evening, I found was not easy. I then thought, access using laptop, add to Kobo Library, then download to Kobo Touch using wifi in The Barn. This is what I wished to try.

I found the Kobo Touch was not very responsive. Maybe my inept fingers, though could also be because it was cold. I could not find Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. Maybe I had done something wrong last night, or as I was accessing now. I started again, found the book in the Kobo Store, added to Library and downloaded. It was so fast, literally a matter of seconds, I thought nothing had happened. But yes, it had downloaded, it was now on the Kobo Touch, available to read.

Time to take my leave of The Barn. Luckily bus on time, and my next bus, only a few minutes wait.

Saturday night, yet another storm hits.

Synchronicity: The coming together of inner and outer events in a way that cannot be explained by cause and effect and that is meaningful to the observer.

Heather Golding: Singer-songrwiter, Kutura, improvisation voice and harp recorded in Farnham Parish Church.

Kutura is a wonderful album, beautiful, haunting music, makes good use of the acoustics of the church. Talking to Heather Golding, one would never expect this beautiful singing voice. I cannot wait for her to upload to bandcamp, in order that Kutura reaches a much wider audience.

One Response to “Synchronicity, The Barn and a singer-songwriter”

  1. keithpp Says:

    Late this afternoon, I met my lovely friend Annie from Sri Lanka. I told her of synchronicity, of meeting Heather Golding at The Barn, of her music, of El Camino de Santiago, of giving Heather a copy of The Pilgrimage.

    Annie gave it some thought, then her face lit up: I know who you are talking about, I have met her.

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