How the British Fell in Love With Food

How the British Fell in Love With Food

How the British Fell in Love With Food

12 April 1984, a small group of people met and formed the Guild of Food Writers.

A cookery book is usually one chef or writer. In this, How the British Fell in Love With Food is unusual, it has contributions from the Guild of Food Writers. From Jane Grigson to Rich Stein and Raymond Blanc to Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall. Noticeable by his absence is Jamie Oliver.

But despite, or maybe because of, a plethora of cookbooks (glossy coffee table cookbooks are never out of the best seller lists), the English cannot cook, they are not in love with food. Cookbooks are to impress. Sadly cooking is seen as a chore, something to spend the minimum amount of time and money on.

Contrary to the title, the British have not fallen in love with food, I only wish it were true.

A couple of years ago I started an article on how dire was the state of food in Britain. I must revisit it one day.

There are though rarities, little oasis in an otherwise food desert. For example The Deli in North Camp. Then there is Brighton where one is spoilt for choice, Taj the greengrocer, Infinity Foods, Iydea. Then the delight I came across at the beginning of the week, Grocer and Grain.

How the British Fell in Love With Food is a celebration of 25 years of the Guild of Food Writers.

For my lovely friend Sian who likes to try new things.

Also see

Jamie’s Dinners

Cook With Jamie

Bad Food Britain

Not on the Label

Two Caravans

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